2019-05-23_13h20_27

3D Printing in June

Replicator World’s monthly tour of 3D printing begins in Detroit.  All3DP reports on the unveiling of a 3D printed industrial diamond composite.  This composite was unveiled by Swedish engineers from the company Sandvik at RAPID + TCT in Detroit.

In what these engineers claim is a world’s first, this truly shows the capability of 3D printing at this moment in time.  Indeed, “diamond composite is 58 times harder than anything found in nature and is used in tools for drilling and machining.”

As Sandvik Delivery Manager Anders Ohlsson explains: “even now we are just starting to grasp the possibilities and applications that this breakthrough could have.  Upon seeing its potential, we began to wonder what else would be possible from 3D printing complex shapes in a material three times stiffer than steel, with heat conductivity higher than copper, the thermal expansion close to Invar, and with a density close to aluminum.”

Sandvik believes “the diamond composite will revolutionize the machining industry and result in new advanced applications in space programs and wear parts.  Sandvik’s material is not synthetic or natural, but a composite which is mostly pure diamond. However, it also has a matrix material to ensure it can be printed. The result has most of the physical properties of pure diamond.”

To create these complex geometries, the Sandvik engineering team “print a semi-liquid mixture of polymer and diamond powder using an SLA 3D printer. After this is complete, the engineers perform a proprietary post-processing method, which ensures the properties of a dense diamond composite are produced.”

Uppsala University’s Adjunct Professor in Applied Materials Science Susanne Norgren concludes: “Sandvik’s 3D printed diamond composite is a true innovation.  It means we can begin to use diamond in applications and shapes never conceived possible before.”

Elsewhere, ZDNet reports Heineken, the adult beverage company, is using Ultimaker 3D printers to 3D print on-demand brewery parts.  This is in order “to customize and redesign custom parts for its production lines.”

This innovation is occurring in one of Heineken’s breweries in Seville, Spain.  Specifically, the company is using “a set of Ultimaker S5 printers to design and print its safety devices, tools, and parts.”  In the past, Heineken outsourced the creation of these parts to third party vendors.  However, now, due to the wonders of 3D printing, Heineken is “able to save about 80% in production costs.”

“Another perk has been uptime at the brewery. Heineken’s Seville brewery produces about 400 million liters of beer a year. Heineken has been leveraging Ultimaker 3D printers for a year or so. It started with the Ultimaker 2+, but now uses Ultimaker S5 printers, which are larger.”

In all, Heineken is using 3D printing for “printing parts for the production line to avoid downtime and create parts on demand, tweaking and optimizing part designs (Heineken has retooled designs as it replaces parts), creating quality control and maintenance teams, and bolstering safety by printing parts that prevent accidents.”

Jumping from Heineken back to America, Built in Chicago reports on Impossible Objects, which has just “announced its latest industrial 3D printer, CBAM-2, which is designed to be 10 times faster than the traditional 3D printing process. In addition, Impossible Objects also raised $4.1 million in funding to meet the growing demand for its 3D printers and printing materials.”

Impossible Objects, which was founded in Northbrook, Illinois back in 2011, aimed to create impressive 3D printers from its outset.  “The company paired carbon fiber and fiberglass with Nylon and PEEK, the plastic polymer commonly used in 3D printing, to create what it claims is a stronger, lighter, and more flexible material. Its printers are designed for volume production.”

As Impossible Objects Founder and Chairman Bob Swartz elaborates: “It’s been exciting to see how our customers are putting our approach to work to create high-performance parts for everything from aircraft and cars to lightweight athletic gear.  We’re continuing to bring machines, materials, and expertise to the market to transform the entire manufacturing process, from prototyping through to high-volume production.”

The goal with the CBAM-2 is to “allow manufacturers to print things like car or airplane parts at volume.”  As Swartz explains, “you can now use the machine in manufacturing and you can start making parts in volume at speeds, which our competitors can’t make.  This is a machine for production, not just prototypes.”

Previously, Impossible Objects has partnered with such illustrious manufacturers as the Ford Motor Company, Jabil, the U.S. Air Force, The National Institute for Aviation Research, and the Utah Advanced Materials & Manufacturing Initiative.

Finally, SmileDirectClub co-founders Alex Fenkell and Jordan Katzman met, according to Venture Beat, “as teens at summer camp when they both had metal braces.  They later decided innovations in technology and telehealth could democratize access to safe, affordable, and convenient orthodontic care.”

Fenkell and Katzman started SmileDirectClub “in 2014 using a digital network of state-licensed dentists and orthodontists who prescribe teeth straightening treatment plans and manage all aspects of clinical care — from diagnosis to the completion of treatment — using the company’s proprietary teledentistry platform. To date, they have served half a million customers in the U.S., Canada, and Puerto Rico, with plans to expand to Australia and the United Kingdom in 2019.”

Now, “HP and SmileDirectClub hope to disrupt the $12 billion orthodontics business by making 3D printed teeth molds.”  The two companies announced their partnership at the Rapid 2019 3D printing conference.

Apparently, SmileDirectClub “will use 49 HP Jet Fusion 3D printing systems around the clock to make more than 50,000 unique mouth molds per day.  This means it has the capacity to make as many as 20 million individualized 3D printed mouth molds in the next 12 months.”

As Fenkell explains: “SmileDirectClub is digitally transforming the traditional orthodontics industry, making it more personal, affordable, and convenient for millions of consumers to achieve a smile they’ll love.  HP’s breakthrough 3D printing and data intelligence platform makes this level of disruption possible for us, pushing productivity, quality, and manufacturing predictability to unprecedented levels, all with economics allowing us to pass on savings to the consumers seeking treatment using our teledentistry platform.”

HP’s President of 3D Printing and Digital Manufacturing Christoph Schell concludes: “SmileDirectClub and HP are reinventing the future of orthodontics, pushing the boundaries of customized 3D mass production and democratizing access to affordable, high-quality teeth straightening for millions of people.  Through this collaboration, HP is helping SmileDirectClub accelerate its growth, enabling a new era of personalized consumer experiences only made possible by industrial 3D printing and digital manufacturing.”

Join us next month for more up to the minute 3D printing news!

Image Courtesy of All3DP

Quotes Courtesy of All3DP, ZDNet, Heineken, Ultimaker, Built in Chicago, Venture Beat, HP, and SmileDirectClub

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Impossible Objects Unveils New 3D Printer

Built in Chicago reports on Impossible Objects, which has just “announced its latest industrial 3D printer, CBAM-2, which is designed to be 10 times faster than the traditional 3D printing process. In addition, Impossible Objects also raised $4.1 million in funding to meet the growing demand for its 3D printers and printing materials.”

Impossible Objects, which was founded in Northbrook, Illinois back in 2011, aimed to create impressive 3D printers from its outset.  “The company paired carbon fiber and fiberglass with Nylon and PEEK, the plastic polymer commonly used in 3D printing, to create what it claims is a stronger, lighter, and more flexible material. Its printers are designed for volume production.”

As Impossible Objects Founder and Chairman Bob Swartz elaborates: “It’s been exciting to see how our customers are putting our approach to work to create high-performance parts for everything from aircraft and cars to lightweight athletic gear.  We’re continuing to bring machines, materials, and expertise to the market to transform the entire manufacturing process, from prototyping through to high-volume production.”

The goal with the CBAM-2 is to “allow manufacturers to print things like car or airplane parts at volume.”  As Swartz explains, “you can now use the machine in manufacturing and you can start making parts in volume at speeds, which our competitors can’t make.  This is a machine for production, not just prototypes.”

Previously, Impossible Objects has partnered with such illustrious manufacturers as the Ford Motor Company, Jabil, the U.S. Air Force, The National Institute for Aviation Research, and the Utah Advanced Materials & Manufacturing Initiative.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Built in Chicago

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2019-05-14_13h41_00

3D Printed Neighborhood to be Constructed in 24 Hours

Popular Mechanics reports on a ‘secret’ project to be completed somewhere in Latin America.  Apparently, San Francisco-based design firm Fuseproject will be 3D printing 50 homes in a 24-hour period for local farmers and weavers.  This project was envisioned in “conjunction with the housing non-profit New Story and ICON, a construction technologies company.”

As Fuseproject’s Founder Yves Behar explains: “you can shape the walls to have different functionality; you can create a shower stall that doesn’t have sharp corners.  Homeowners can specify a two- or three-bedroom plan and the exterior concrete can be tinted different colors so it doesn’t become that cookie-cutter look.”

According to the company’s website, “Fuseproject worked with people in the undisclosed community to learn more about their culture and make sure the housing options made sense for their environment.  We used 3D technology and the unique design possibilities it enables to provide solutions that addressed important questions related to climate, family structure, and the role homes play in creating a larger community.”

“For families living on less than $200 per month, access to safe housing that provides shelter from both environmental and physical danger is critical.”

As New Story’s CEO Brett Hagler concludes: “We feel it’s our responsibility to challenge traditional methods.  Linear methods will never reach the billion-plus people who need safe homes. Challenging our assumptions, iterating based on data, and taking calculated risks on innovative ideas will allow us to reach more families with the best possible solutions, exponentially faster.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Popular Mechanics

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Roboze Xtreme Series 3D Printers to Debut in North America

3D Printing Industry reports on Italian 3D printer manufacturer Roboze, who “will be showcasing its high temperature ROBOZE Xtreme series [of 3D printers] for the first time in North America at RAPID+TCT 2019.”  This year, the exhibition will be held in Detroit.

Roboze’s Founder and CEO Alessio Lorusso explains his reasoning for this showcase: “in terms of demand, North America is one of the most important markets for Roboze.  The technology we offer is the answer that today’s US businessmen are looking for to strengthen their productivity with high temperature and composite materials for the production of finished parts with the maximum precision.”

“The new ROBOZE Xtreme series made its debut at Formnext 2018, and features the ROBOZE One Xtreme and ROBOZE One+400 Xtreme 3D printers. Both systems work using the company’s patented Beltless System, designed for precise, industrial-use projects, and its High Viscosity Polymers (HVP) extruder.  The ROBOZE Xtreme series was created to bridge the gap between Roboze’s production additive manufacturing system, the Argo 500, and desktop-sized 3D printers, the ROBOZE One and ROBOZE One+400.”

As for the Beltless System, “The racks and helical pinions…are machined with chemical nickel plating increasing the precision of X/Y axis by 15μm, as well as providing improved corrosion resistance. For comparison, previous Beltless System 3D printers from Roboze used racks and helical pinions made from tempered steel, providing a 50μm layer accuracy.”

Lorusso concludes: “RAPID +TCT will give us the opportunity to show the North American market the best of our 3D printers.  It will offer us the chance to create new and interesting synergies, aiming at meeting the strong need of 3D printing solutions with high temperature superpolymers and composite materials for metal replacement.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry

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2019-05-14_14h24_10

HP Launches Jet Fusion 5200

CNET reports on a recent announcement made by HP.  HP is launching the Jet Fusion 5200, which is a 3D printer “designed for large-scale manufacturing.”  The Jet Fusion 5200 “could create more profound changes than the more common 3D printers used to build prototypes.”

According to HP, ‘high-volume’ manufacturing is “a market with more potential for profound change than the more common 3D printers used to build prototypes, or, like HP’s earlier Jet Fusion 4200, for small-scale production.”  For now, HP has yet to disclose their pricing plans for the Jet Fusion 5200.

HP is also announcing a partnership with BASF, which will give customers the capability of 3D printing “with the flexible plastic called thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) with the HP Jet Fusion 5200.”  Already, wind turbine maker Vestas has used this thermoplastic polyurethane in order to 3D print “impact-absorbing clamps.  HP also showed off a helmet made using the material internally.”

As Chief Executive of 3D printing company Sculpteo (an HP partner) Clement Moreau elaborates: “the 3D printing industry is still maturing.  For example, [Sculpteo] was outbid by a traditional manufacturing on a recent contract to manufacture some elements of a train station.  3D printing large metallic parts is quite expensive.”

Moreau is encouraged though: “people will definitely need a lot of engineering mockups and visualization mockups [from 3D printing for a multitude of engineering projects.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of CNET

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HP Teams Up With SmileDirectClub

SmileDirectClub co-founders Alex Fenkell and Jordan Katzman met, according to Venture Beat, “as teens at summer camp when they both had metal braces.  They later decided innovations in technology and telehealth could democratize access to safe, affordable, and convenient orthodontic care.”

Fenkell and Katzman started SmileDirectClub “in 2014 using a digital network of state-licensed dentists and orthodontists who prescribe teeth straightening treatment plans and manage all aspects of clinical care — from diagnosis to the completion of treatment — using the company’s proprietary teledentistry platform. To date, they have served half a million customers in the U.S., Canada, and Puerto Rico, with plans to expand to Australia and the United Kingdom in 2019.”

Now, “HP and SmileDirectClub hope to disrupt the $12 billion orthodontics business by making 3D printed teeth molds.”  The two companies announced their partnership at the Rapid 2019 3D printing conference.

Apparently, SmileDirectClub “will use 49 HP Jet Fusion 3D printing systems around the clock to make more than 50,000 unique mouth molds per day.  This means it has the capacity to make as many as 20 million individualized 3D printed mouth molds in the next 12 months.”

As Fenkell explains: “SmileDirectClub is digitally transforming the traditional orthodontics industry, making it more personal, affordable, and convenient for millions of consumers to achieve a smile they’ll love.  HP’s breakthrough 3D printing and data intelligence platform makes this level of disruption possible for us, pushing productivity, quality, and manufacturing predictability to unprecedented levels, all with economics allowing us to pass on savings to the consumers seeking treatment using our teledentistry platform.”

HP’s President of 3D Printing and Digital Manufacturing Christoph Schell concludes: “SmileDirectClub and HP are reinventing the future of orthodontics, pushing the boundaries of customized 3D mass production and democratizing access to affordable, high-quality teeth straightening for millions of people.  Through this collaboration, HP is helping SmileDirectClub accelerate its growth, enabling a new era of personalized consumer experiences only made possible by industrial 3D printing and digital manufacturing.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Venture Beat, HP, and SmileDirectClub

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2019-05-23_13h20_27

3D Printed Industrial Diamond Composite

All3DP reports on the unveiling of a 3D printed industrial diamond composite.  This composite was unveiled by Swedish engineers from the company Sandvik at RAPID + TCT in Detroit.

In what these engineers claim is a world’s first, this truly shows the capability of 3D printing at this moment in time.  Indeed, “diamond composite is 58 times harder than anything found in nature and is used in tools for drilling and machining.”

As Sandvik Delivery Manager Anders Ohlsson explains: “even now we are just starting to grasp the possibilities and applications that this breakthrough could have.  Upon seeing its potential, we began to wonder what else would be possible from 3D printing complex shapes in a material three times stiffer than steel, with heat conductivity higher than copper, the thermal expansion close to Invar, and with a density close to aluminum.”

Sandvik believes “the diamond composite will revolutionize the machining industry and result in new advanced applications in space programs and wear parts.  Sandvik’s material is not synthetic or natural, but a composite which is mostly pure diamond. However, it also has a matrix material to ensure it can be printed. The result has most of the physical properties of pure diamond.”

To create these complex geometries, the Sandvik engineering team “print a semi-liquid mixture of polymer and diamond powder using an SLA 3D printer. After this is complete, the engineers perform a proprietary post-processing method, which ensures the properties of a dense diamond composite are produced.”

Uppsala University’s Adjunct Professor in Applied Materials Science Susanne Norgren concludes: “Sandvik’s 3D printed diamond composite is a true innovation.  It means we can begin to use diamond in applications and shapes never conceived possible before.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of All3DP

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NASA Holds 3D Printed Habitat Design Contest

Business Insider reports on another NASA contest attempting to discover the best 3D printed habitat design for Mars exploration.  The ‘3D Printed Habitat Challenge’ finally revealed a winner, following four years of competition.

The goal of this contest was to find out the best 3D printable habitat for sheltering humans on Mars.  “The winning design, known as Marsha, features vertical pods whose outer shells are made from materials naturally found on the red planet.  The pods also feature hatches capable of deploying space suits and a docking port for a Mars Exploration Rover.”  These pods can also be 3D printed in 30 hours.

The team who designed Marsha, AI SpaceFactory, was awarded $500,000.  Marsha, which is for now a prototype, “will soon be recycled into a real-life habitat on Earth.”

Marsha features vertical pods “which mimic Earth’s natural lighting, while offering a peek at their surroundings.  The pod windows can shield inhabitants from solar radiation.  The exterior of these pods consist of double-coated shells, which keep the internal temperature consistent.  AI SpaceFactory refers to the prototype as ‘a tiny bubble of Earth.’  The design features a garden, kitchen, and a room for exercise and recreation.  For the final round of the competition, the design was printed before a live audience in just 30 hours.  An industrial robot was raised by a forklift to print the 15-foot habitat, which contains around 550 layers of material.”

NASA explained they chose this specific design because, while “other teams designed low-lying domes, AI SpaceFactory’s vertical pods are better suited to handle the atmospheric pressure on Mars.  By printing vertically, the company can keep its industrial robot in one place instead of making it roam across terrain.”

AI SpaceFactory’s Founder and CEO David Malott concludes: “we developed these technologies for space, but they have the potential to transform the way we build on Earth.  By using natural, biodegradable materials grown from crops, we could eliminate the building industry’s massive waste.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of NASA, AI SpaceFactory, and Business Insider

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Chervona Hvilya Showcases xBeam Metal 3D Printing System

3D Printing Industry reports on a recent 3D printing showcase, which occurred last month at RAPID + TCT in Detroit.  Apparently, Chervona Hvilya, a Ukrainian manufacturer known for Electron Beam Melting (EBM) equipment, “showcased its latest metal additive manufacturing technology.”

This technology, which the company has dubbed ‘xBeam’ “utilizes a hollow conical electron beam as the heating source and a coaxial supply of feedstock wire to produce quality metal 3D printed parts at a fast production rate. The UK research and technology organization TWI was the first to order an xBeam system, the xBeam-18/I metal 3D printer.”

As TWI’s Senior Project Leader Dr. Sofia Del Pozo explains: “the xBeam system and its unique features, which allow the feeding of the wire coaxially, will give us the opportunity to explore a great number of possibilities for 3D printing parts with wire.  The system will offer a high level of flexibility along with precise process control. We are really excited about being the first ones to develop the xBeam coaxial system to produce meter scale parts for the aerospace sector.”

Indeed, TWI “is working with Chervona Hvilya among others, to develop specialized software for CAD/CAM control interfacing across the range of OAAM EBM technologies, such as xBeam.”

As for these two companies’ plans for the future, “upon the arrival of the xBeam system at TWI’s Cambridge facility in the autumn of this year, the partners will seek to advance the capabilities of electron beam wire and laser-powder/laser-wire processes.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry

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Henkel Acquires Molecule Corp.

3DPrint reports on a recent announcement made by German company Henkel concerning the acquisition of Molecule Corp.  This acquisition will strengthen their 3D printing and materials division.

Molecule Corp. is based in Concord, CA, which is near the San Francisco Bay area.  “This addition to the Henkel portfolio should propel them further into the technology realm as they continue to find success in their plan for making ‘targeted acquisitions,’ along with fortifying their additive manufacturing processes for production of strong, functional parts made from a variety of materials.”

Additionally, “the technology and expertise built thus far by the Molecule Corp. team will also complement Henkel’s current strategies for research and development of new materials and techniques such as inkjet printing.”

As Henkel’s Head of 3D Printing Philipp Loosen explains “Molecule Corp. and Henkel are an excellent fit.  Molecule’s strong 3D printing and inkjet resin technologies and digital development capabilities perfectly complement and strengthen our materials portfolio and build on our approach to offer a comprehensive range of customized additive manufacturing solutions.”

Molecule Corp.’s Founder and President Ken Kisner concludes: “we are excited to join Henkel.  Henkel’s customer centered approach along with our combined product portfolio will help key industries accelerate the speed of innovation and move 3D printing from prototyping to digital manufacturing.”

Image and Quote Courtesy of 3DPrint

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Heineken 3D Prints On-Demand Brewery Parts

ZDNet reports Heineken, the adult beverage company, is using Ultimaker 3D printers to 3D print on-demand brewery parts.  This is in order “to customize and redesign custom parts for its production lines.”

This innovation is occurring in one of Heineken’s breweries in Seville, Spain.  Specifically, the company is using “a set of Ultimaker S5 printers to design and print its safety devices, tools, and parts.”  In the past, Heineken outsourced the creation of these parts to third party vendors.  However, now, due to the wonders of 3D printing, Heineken is “able to save about 80% in production costs.”

“Another perk has been uptime at the brewery. Heineken’s Seville brewery produces about 400 million liters of beer a year. Heineken has been leveraging Ultimaker 3D printers for a year or so. It started with the Ultimaker 2+, but now uses Ultimaker S5 printers, which are larger.”

In all, Heineken is using 3D printing for “printing parts for the production line to avoid downtime and create parts on demand, tweaking and optimizing part designs (Heineken has retooled designs as it replaces parts), creating quality control and maintenance teams, and bolstering safety by printing parts that prevent accidents.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of ZDNet, Heineken, and Ultimaker

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3D Printing at the 2019 Met Gala

MIT Technology Review was on hand at this year’s 2019 Met Gala.  “The fund-raising event for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York is famous for the impressive, wild, and avant-garde looks warn by some of the biggest celebrities.”  This year’s theme was ‘Camp.’

“Five of the outfits flaunted massive 3D printed components, all created by designer Zac Posen in collaboration with GE Additive and Protolabs.  The four gowns and one headdress, worn by the likes of Jourdan Dunn, Katie Holmes, and Nina Dobrev, took six months to put together.”

“Each of the women wearing the 3D-printed outfits was scanned in advance to ensure the pieces could be modeled with design software to perfectly fit her body.”

Interestingly, “the pieces were primarily created using stereolithography (SLA) to get the high-quality finishes Posen was seeking. This method of 3D printing uses an ultraviolet laser to slowly cure a pool of resin. One layer at a time, the laser fires into the resin in a pattern dictated by a computer in which the 3D model has been loaded. The result is a hardened, smooth sculpture that is then painted or polished.”

Indeed, “the most intensive look, modeled after rose petals and worn by British model Jourdan Dunn, took more than 1,100 hours to create.”

As Director of Business Development for the 3D printing company MatterHackers Mara Hitner explains: “I don’t think 3D printing will ever replace traditional fabrics, but when you are talking custom one-off items, things meant for one person for an event, 3D printing is an excellent option.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of MIT Technology Review

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