2017-03-13_10h20_34

3D Printing Our World

The 3D printing industry has disrupted countless industries in the last few years.  The healthcare industry, the auto industry, the footwear industry – even the culinary industry!  But another major industry additive manufacturing is turning on its head right now is the industry which focuses on how we create our environment.  No, it’s not just the architectural industry, but this month’s story does start there…

Futurism reports on a stunning breakthrough for the world of 3D printing.  A residential home in Russia was 3D printed in 24 hours for just a little over $10,000.

This beautiful abode was developed and 3D printed by Russian company Apis Cor., “dedicated to building the world with printing.”  The house was printed in the town Stupino, a region just outside Moscow.

“Construction took [a mere] 24 freezing hours [in December of 2016], through temperatures of   -35C degrees (-31F degrees).  The home, equipped with a living room, kitchen, bathroom, and a hallway, was made on-site, a world’s first for 3D printed buildings constructed in that amount of time.”  This 38-square-meter (409-square-foot) marvel cost $10,134 to create, “including the expenses of work, materials for the construction, and furnishing.  That’s $275 per square meter, but the company is confident that a square house with a simpler design and averagely priced materials would cost only $223 per square meter.”

As plainly illustrated in Apis Cor.’s video, “the construction of the home was made possible by a mobile 3D printer.  Once the mobile printer had completed the walls, it was removed with a crane manipulator to allow manual workers to come in and finish the job.”

To conclude, Apis Cor. argues “its method of 3D printing homes cuts 70% of costs compared to traditional methods.  The company is prepared to help the construction industry pivot to 3D printing for future homes around the world.”

When it comes to indoors, well, 3D printing has you covered there too.

Seeker got the scoop on an intriguing new 3D printing system currently under development in Sweden.  Swedish masters of physics student (and inventor) Torbjorn Ludvigsen, who studies at Umea University, “has spent the last three years developing a new kind of large-format 3D printer that can build furniture-sized objects in any room – surprisingly easily and relatively cheaply.”

Ludvigsen calls his new invention the ‘Hangprinter.’  The Hangprinter “employs a system of wires and computer-controlled pulleys anchored to the walls, floor, and ceiling.  Once installed, the Hangprinter essentially uses the room itself as a casing…all the hardware and firmware components can be purchased for about $250.”

How can it be so cheap?  Well, the Hangprinter is open source – part of the RepRap online community.  Therefore, “anyone can download the instructions and add improvements – or incorporate upgrades designed by other makers.  Finally, the Hangprinter is designed to self-replicate.  Most of the component parts needed to make a Hangprinter can be printed out by the Hangprinter itself.”

Ludvigsen envisions a world where 3D printing is in the hands of the people: “specifically, I want 3D printing to avoid the fate of the 2D printing business, where machines are programmed to self-destruct after a certain [number] of prints.  My best bet to avoid this is to go for not only open source, but self-replication by design.  Hangprinter is designed to manufacture a large fraction if its own parts and to be easy to build, copy, and make money from.”

Ludvigsen has demonstrated the Hangprinter at work, creating “a relatively simple and functional object – a lampshade.  The Hangprinter has also been cut loose on more artistic projects.  Ludvigsen recently used the system to assemble a five-foot sculpture of the Tower of Babel.”

“Ludvigsen hopes the Hangprinter will become versatile enough to print out furniture, tools, and possibly fully functional additional machines with moving parts of their own.”

In his own words, Ludvigsen says, “in addition to avoiding self-destructing machines, open source machinery may also distribute wealth and power towards median families like the one I grew up in.”

“[Hangprinter’s system] is a flexible manufacturing technique, so it will be useful in lots of different situations that I cannot foresee.  Some of them might be very important/cool/useful.  I wouldn’t want to stand in the way of important, cool, and useful things happening.”

It’s not just indoors where 3D printing can change the look of architectural structures, however…

Engineering reports another breakthrough by 3D printing company Micron3DP.  About a year ago, this company “announced its ability to 3D print molten glass.”  Now, Micron3DP says they “have installed alpha glass 3D printers within [their] own facilities for internal operation.”

Micron3DP’s new ‘alpha glass’ 3D printers “have build volumes…comparable to industrial fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printers at 200 mm x 200 mm x 300 mm and layer thicknesses as fine as 100 microns.  Micron3DP’s patent-pending technology relies on an FDM-style approach, heating the material up to 1000 [degrees] Celsius.”

So far, however, “the only materials successfully printed [by Micron3DP’s new ‘alpha glass’ 3D printers] are soda lime and borosilicate [vases and other objects.”  In the future, though, Micron3DP’s staff envisions a world where these 3D printers’ capabilities could expand.

“From the looks of the parts printed so far, the material has limited use in terms of optics, but may be useful for its chemical resistance, sterilizability and ability to withstand high temperatures.  Micron3DP believes it will be useful in such fields as healthcare, architecture, the arts, security, microfluidics, and scientific research.”

Just imagine: now that the 3D printing industry is beginning to create buildings on a mass scale; not only could construction companies utilize 3D printing to print those buildings’ walls, but also their windows as well!

But what about the future of this intersection between architecture and additive manufacturing?

The Independent reports on a major new announcement made by a construction firm based out of the city of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates.  Cazza, the firm, “announced plans to build the world’s first 3D printed skyscraper…it will be erected in the United Arab Emirates.”

Of course, more and more houses and other buildings are being 3D printed around the world – but 3D printing an entire skyscraper is another feat altogether!  Typically, skyscrapers are buildings which rise (at the bare minimum) 40 or 50 stories above the ground.  How will Cazza 3D print such a structure?

Well, Cazza says they will utilize “a new technique called ‘crane printing’ to create the building.”  As Cazza CEO Chris Kelsey explains: “when we first thought of implementing 3D printing technologies, we were mostly thinking of houses and low-rise buildings.  Developers kept asking us if it was possible to build a 3D printed skyscraper.  This led us to begin researching how we could adapt the technologies for taller structures.”

“Through our technologies, we will be able to build architecturally complex building at never before seen speeds.  It is all about economies of scale where the initial high technology costs will reduce as we enter the mass production phase.”

Cazza has yet to announce exactly how high this 3D printed skyscraper will end up being, but “concrete and steel will be two of the materials printed by the company’s cranes [on this project.]”

Cazza’s Chief Operating Officer, Fernando De Los Rios, explains their company’s crane printing technique: “the crane printing system can be easily adopted with existing cranes which means we don’t have to build cranes from scratch.  We are adding new features to make it adaptable to high wind speeds along with the use of our layer smoothing system that creates completely flat surfaces.  You won’t know it’s 3D printed.”

Cazza hasn’t released word, yet, on when (or where, exactly) this project will break ground.

The future does indeed look bright for this kind of technological intersection.  The architectural industry will never look the same again – and it’s all thanks to 3D printing!

Image Courtesy of Apis Cor.

Quotes Courtesy of Futurism, Seeker, Engineering, and The Independent

 

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MIT: 3D Printing in Cellulose

Campus Technology reports on a recent paper published by Advanced Materials Technologies, a Wiley journal.  This paper was written by researchers at MIT, who have been funded by a National Science Foundation grant.

These researchers, “led by post-doctoral fellow Sebastian Pattinson,” were attempting to “come up with a possible renewable and biodegradable alternative to the more commonly used ABS and PLA [3D] printing materials.”

And they succeeded!

The MIT researchers discovered a way to 3D print in cellulose, “the same abundantly available fiber that gives plants their structure…cellulose is already used for that most common of printing medium – paper.  But until now, efforts to use it as an ingredient in 3D printing have run into snags.”

“One problem is that 3D printing requires heating up the printing material to make it flowable; but cellulose tends to decompose when it’s heated, owing in part to the destruction of its hydrogen bonds.  Also, the bonding among cellulose molecules in high-concentration cellulose solutions creates a polymer that is too sticky for 3D extrusion.”

In order to bypass these obstacles, Pattinson and his team “worked with cellulose acetate, a composition that’s easily made and widely available and that can be used at room temperatures… [in this new MIT developed process,] cellulose acetate dissolves in acetone and pours through a nozzle.  As the acetone evaporates, the cellulose acetate solidifies into place.  A subsequent optional process increases the strength of the printed parts.”

“To demonstrate the ‘chemical versatility’ of the printing process using cellulose, Pattinson and his team added a touch of antimicrobial dye to the cellulose acetate ink and 3D printed a set of antimicrobial surgical tweezers.”  Pattinson suggested “this type of custom tool could be useful for remote medical settings where surgical tools are difficult to obtain and where the sterility of the operating room isn’t ideal.”

Pattinson concludes: “Cellulose is the most important component in giving wood its mechanical properties.  And because it’s so inexpensive, it’s bio renewable, biodegradable, and also very chemically versatile.  It’s also highly common.  Cellulose and its derivatives are already used in pharmaceuticals, medical devices, as food additives, building materials, and clothing.  A lot of these kinds of products would benefit from the kind of customization that 3D printing enables.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of MIT and Campus Technology

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Voodoo Manufacturing Unveils ‘Project Skywalker’

Technical.ly Brooklyn reports on yet another announcement by the Bushwick, New York-based company Voodoo Manufacturing.  Voodoo Manufacturing has unveiled ‘Project Skywalker,’ a robotic arm, which will be used to ‘harvest’ 3D printers.

“The robot, which looks like an Inspector Gadget arm, will be able to remove the plates on which items have been printed and replace them with fresh ones.  So far, the project is just a demo, but a fully operational system is the goal.”

As Max Friefeld, one of Voodoo Manufacturing Co-Founders explains, “this is a huge deal for us because automation is a key to how we’re going to reduce costs and compete for the $200 billion injection molding market.  Voodoo’s factory employees spend approximately 10% of their working hours harvesting printers.  By using a robot to harvest our printers, we can increase our factory’s capacity by close to 400% from what it is today.”

As previously reported by Replicator World earlier this year, Voodoo Manufacturing “raised $1.4 million to build out its team of human workers, with an eye toward building its own factory in the future.”  Now, not only will Voodoo Manufacturing have an army of humans doing its bidding, but an army of robots as well!

One of Voodoo Manufacturing’s other Co-Founders, Jonathan Schwartz, concluded: “[Project Skywalker is] going to allow us to keep our factory up and running 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.”

Image Courtesy of Voodoo Manufacturing

Quotes Courtesy of Technical.ly Brooklyn

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First 3D Printed Skyscraper to be Erected in Dubai

The Independent reports on a major new announcement made by a construction firm based out of the city of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates.  Cazza, the firm, “announced plans to build the world’s first 3D printed skyscraper…it will be erected in the United Arab Emirates.”

Of course, more and more houses and other buildings are being 3D printed around the world – but 3D printing an entire skyscraper is another feat altogether!  Typically, skyscrapers are buildings which rise (at the bare minimum) 40 or 50 stories above the ground.  How will Cazza 3D print such a structure?

Well, Cazza says they will utilize “a new technique called ‘crane printing’ to create the building.”  As Cazza CEO Chris Kelsey explains: “when we first thought of implementing 3D printing technologies, we were mostly thinking of houses and low-rise buildings.  Developers kept asking us if it was possible to build a 3D printed skyscraper.  This led us to begin researching how we could adapt the technologies for taller structures.”

“Through our technologies, we will be able to build architecturally complex building at never before seen speeds.  It is all about economies of scale where the initial high technology costs will reduce as we enter the mass production phase.”

Cazza has yet to announce exactly how high this 3D printed skyscraper will end up being, but “concrete and steel will be two of the materials printed by the company’s cranes [on this project.]”

Cazza’s Chief Operating Officer, Fernando De Los Rios, explains their company’s crane printing technique: “the crane printing system can be easily adopted with existing cranes which means we don’t have to build cranes from scratch.  We are adding new features to make it adaptable to high wind speeds along with the use of our layer smoothing system that creates completely flat surfaces.  You won’t know it’s 3D printed.”

Cazza hasn’t released word, yet, on when (or where, exactly) this project will break ground.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of The Independent

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Turn Any Room Into A 3D Printer!

Seeker got the scoop on an intriguing new 3D printing system currently under development in Sweden.  Swedish masters of physics student (and inventor) Torbjorn Ludvigsen, who studies at Umea University, “has spent the last three years developing a new kind of large-format 3D printer that can build furniture-sized objects in any room – surprisingly easily and relatively cheaply.”

Ludvigsen calls his new invention the ‘Hangprinter.’  The Hangprinter “employs a system of wires and computer-controlled pulleys anchored to the walls, floor, and ceiling.  Once installed, the Hangprinter essentially uses the room itself as a casing…all the hardware and firmware components can be purchased for about $250.”

How can it be so cheap?  Well, the Hangprinter is open source – part of the RepRap online community.  Therefore, “anyone can download the instructions and add improvements – or incorporate upgrades designed by other makers.  Finally, the Hangprinter is designed to self-replicate.  Most of the component parts needed to make a Hangprinter can be printed out by the Hangprinter itself.”

Ludvigsen envisions a world where 3D printing is in the hands of the people: “specifically, I want 3D printing to avoid the fate of the 2D printing business, where machines are programmed to self-destruct after a certain [number] of prints.  My best bet to avoid this is to go for not only open source, but self-replication by design.  Hangprinter is designed to manufacture a large fraction if its own parts and to be easy to build, copy, and make money from.”

Ludvigsen has demonstrated the Hangprinter at work, creating “a relatively simple and functional object – a lampshade.  The Hangprinter has also been cut loose on more artistic projects.  Ludvigsen recently used the system to assemble a five-foot sculpture of the Tower of Babel.”

“Ludvigsen hopes the Hangprinter will become versatile enough to print out furniture, tools, and possibly fully functional additional machines with moving parts of their own.”

In his own words, Ludvigsen says, “in addition to avoiding self-destructing machines, open source machinery may also distribute wealth and power towards median families like the one I grew up in.”

“[Hangprinter’s system] is a flexible manufacturing technique, so it will be useful in lots of different situations that I cannot foresee.  Some of them might be very important/cool/useful.  I wouldn’t want to stand in the way of important, cool, and useful things happening.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Seeker

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HP Opens 3D Printing Lab

As reported by Engineering, HP is planning to open a 3D Open Materials and Applications Lab for 3D printing at their 145-acre site in Corvallis, Oregon.

Previously, HP “unveiled and began shipping an entirely new additive manufacturing technology known as Multi Jet Fusion (MJF).  With high-throughput flexibility and the ability to produce industrial-grade parts, the technology holds great promise for the use of additive manufacturing in mainstream manufacturing.”

At the new 3D Open Materials and Applications Lab for 3D printing, “HP’s material partners can collaborate with engineers to develop, test, and receive feedback on new powders for the MJF platform…beginning with four material partners – Arkema, BASF, Evonik, and Lehmann & Voss – HP aims to allow any material manufacturer to develop powders specifically for 3D printing on MJF printers.  Once approved by HP, the powder would be sold in a model similar to the Apple Store.”

As Tim Weber, HP’s Global Head of 3D Materials and Advanced Applications and General Manager of the Corvallis site explains, “there’s no way that HP itself can develop and certify the 30,000 materials made by all the material companies in the world.  Working together in a hands-on, agile development environment enables us to test and certify materials that are compatible with our MJF technology.”

“For this reason, HP developed the 3,500-square-foot Open Materials and Applications Lab, equipped with MJF printers in various states of assembly, as well as analytical tools, including laser point scanners and shear testers.”

“New materials can be tested in the lab, first for such properties as distribution across the printbed and compaction within the build chamber, and then, during the actual build process, as HP’s fusing agent is applied and the infrared lamps fuse the particles together.  The material can subsequently be tested in actual HP 3D printers.”

Weber describes the 3D printing division at Corvallis as a ‘startup within HP.’  “Computers and printers remain the bread and butter of HP.  But, just as inkjet technology eventually replaced the original calculators with which HP began, 3D printing could become the largest division within the company in the future.”

Image Courtesy of HP

Quotes Courtesy of Engineering

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3D Print A $21 Artificial Heart!

Azom reports on a startling new development in medical technology from two teams of scientists from Europe.  Doctor of Engineering Tadeusz Pustelny led a team from the Department of Optoelectronics of the Silesian University of Technology (SUT) in collaboration with Doctor of Engineering Krzysztof Murawski, Doctor of Engineering Leszek Grad, and Doctor of Engineering Artur Arciuch, who led a team of researchers from the Faculty of Cybernetics of the Military University of Technology (MUT) in Warsaw, Poland.

These two teams have developed a 3D printed artificial heart.  “These researchers have printed four models of artificial hearts that have been utilized in tests in which specific algorithms were applied to test the efficiency of the models…the models developed by the team are inspired by the pump for the pneumatic heart assistance device called Religa EXT, which is considered to be a modernized and more efficient version of the POLVAD heart.”

Often, these sorts of traditionally manufactured artificial hearts can cost upwards of $130,000 – but due to these scientists’ hard work and dedication and the wonders of 3D printing – this additively manufactured artificial heart is far, far cheaper!  Only $21 to be exact!

“The artificial heart model is comprised of several parts, including air and blood chambers which were 3D printed on the Zortrax M200 3D printer with Z-PETG and Z-ULTRAT.  The first material was also used to produce a mold to cast the diaphragms.  The process was divided into three stages: firstly, the model of a diaphragm was developed in a modeling program; next the total volume of the diaphragm was examined, and then the 3D printing of the cast for silicone molds prepared.”

“The Zortrax 3D printer also enabled the team to create a model of the chamber.  The additive manufacturing technology enabled all the parts to be developed in a rapid, cost-effective manner, enabling the teams to speed up their study and still stay within their budget.”

Zortrax concludes on these fascinating experiments: “the case of the artificial heart effectively demonstrates the significant potential of 3D printing in producing essential medical equipment which helps improve the study of life-saving devices.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Azom and Zortrax

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MakerBot Launches MinFill Firmware Upgrade

TechCrunch reports on MakerBot’s latest firmware upgrade.  Nicknamed ‘MinFill,’ this firmware upgrade focuses on “infill – the support structures inside a [3D printed] model that keep it from collapsing.”

MakerBot’s MinFill was “designed in-house for the company’s Print software.  [It] runs an algorithm which determines the minimal amount of material required to create sufficient infill for a model, saving on material and print costs – both major sticking points in the technology’s adoption.”

As MakerBot’s VP of Engineering Dave Veisz explains, “you can imagine as you print a complex shape, you get a lot of interesting internal geometries that support the shape in the right places.  The net effect is that [MakerBot MinFill is] going to reduce the amount of filament used and reduce the print time.  So, you’re printing less to get your finished product.”

“The time and cost savings varies, naturally, from project to project, owing much to different sizes and shapes of objects, but Veisz says the savings to both average out around 30%, effectively cutting the amount of material required to print an object by nearly one-third.  Really geometrically complex objects, on the other hand, can have savings of upwards of 80 to 90%.”

“MinFill, which is a simple setting the user checks before starting a print, changes the process of one from simple repeating lattice or crosshatch structures to unique designs customized to the specific print.”

Whether this MinFill technology puts MakerBot back on track after a rough few years remains to be seen…

Image and Quotes Courtesy of TechCrunch

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Micron3DP: 3D Printing in Glass

Engineering reports another breakthrough by 3D printing company Micron3DP.  About a year ago, this company “announced its ability to 3D print molten glass.”  Now, Micron3DP says they “have installed alpha glass 3D printers within [their] own facilities for internal operation.”

Micron3DP’s new ‘alpha glass’ 3D printers “have build volumes…comparable to industrial fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printers at 200 mm x 200 mm x 300 mm and layer thicknesses as fine as 100 microns.  Micron3DP’s patent-pending technology relies on an FDM-style approach, heating the material up to 1000 [degrees] Celsius.”

So far, however, “the only materials successfully printed [by Micron3DP’s new ‘alpha glass’ 3D printers] are soda lime and borosilicate [vases and other objects.”  In the future, though, Micron3DP’s staff envisions a world where these 3D printers’ capabilities could expand.

“From the looks of the parts printed so far, the material has limited use in terms of optics, but may be useful for its chemical resistance, sterilizability and ability to withstand high temperatures.  Micron3DP believes it will be useful in such fields as healthcare, architecture, the arts, security, microfluidics, and scientific research.”

Just imagine: now that the 3D printing industry is beginning to create buildings on a mass scale; not only could construction companies utilize 3D printing to print those buildings’ walls, but also their windows as well!

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Engineering

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US Army 3D Prints ‘RAMBO’ Grenade Launcher

According to The Engineer, the US Army’s Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center (ARDEC) has developed a 3D printed weapon dubbed ‘RAMBO.’

‘RAMBO,’ or ‘Rapid Additively Manufactured Ballistics Ordnance,’ is a nearly 100% fully 3D printed grenade launcher.  “RAMBO is based on the 40mm M203A1 grenade launcher, which contains 50 components.  All of these, with the exception of springs and fasteners, were produced using various additive manufacturing techniques.”

For example, “the barrel and receiver were fabricated from powdered aluminum using direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) in a process that took about 70 hours.  After some machining and tumbling, they received Type III hard-coat anodizing, just like a conventional M203A1.”

“Ammunition for RAMBO was developed by the Army’s Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center (ECBC) and the Army Research Laboratory (ARL).  They chose the M781 40mm training round, as it does not contain any explosives or propellants.”

“The grenade’s windshield, projectile body, and cartridge case were created using selective laser sintering and other processes.  In order to try and replicate the rifling effect imparted on grenade rounds, the team had to experiment with various materials and techniques, as the zinc from which production M781 rounds are made cannot currently be 3D printed.”

RAMBO was designed in conjunction with feedback made by soldiers “from the 2-504 Parachute Infantry Regiment of the Army’s 82nd Airborne Division.”  This feedback “inspired rapidly created weapon prototypes and kits including custom handgrips and adjustable buttstocks, all of which were facilitated by 3D printing.”

“RAMBO and the test rounds were fired for the first time [in October of 2016] at a facility in New Jersey.  According to the researchers, 15 test shots were fired, with muzzle velocities matching conventional grenade launchers to within five percent.  [Additionally], the weapon showed no signs of degradation after firing.”

“RAMBO and its 3D printed ammo are currently undergoing [further] testing [in order] to evaluate their reliability, survivability, and failure rates.”

Video Courtesy of the U.S. Army

Image and Quotes Courtesy of The Engineer

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3D Systems Launches Scalable 3D Printing System for Manufacturers

Forbes reports on yet another launch by 3D printing behemoth 3D Systems.  The company has announced a brand new scalable 3D printing system aimed at manufacturers.

3D Systems “launched its Figure 4 production platform, a system which the company says produces plastic parts 50 times faster than comparable 3D printing systems.  The system is both modular and scalable, ranging from single-print engines to systems comprising 16 or more print engines.”

As Vyomesh Joshi, 3D Systems’s President and CEO, elaborates, “the system is an ultra-fast scalable platform working across verticals – aerospace, automotive, healthcare, dental, and durable goods.  It’s configurable for different applications.”

3D Systems plans to target the dental industry first with their Figure 4 production platform.  As Joshi explains, “we think there’s a $3.7 billion opportunity for 3D printing in dentistry by 2021.”  3D printing provides several advantages when it comes to applications in the dental industry.

“One of these is the accuracy of the fit – because many dentists today already make use of 3D scanners for their patients, it’s a simple step to use those scans to 3D print items like crowns and dentures.  The 3D printing can also produce dental devices faster than traditional milling techniques.”  As Joshi gleefully points out: “our system can print 20-30 crowns in fewer than 15 minutes, which is the same time it takes most milling solutions to produce a single crown.”

“3D Systems’s first target in the dental industry will be large dental labs, who manufacture dental apparatuses on a large scale.  But because the system is modular, they’ll also be looking at smaller labs as well as some large dental practices that have already been insourcing some of their manufacturing.”

Joshi concludes, however: “this is not just a dental story.  We are going to do this for every single vertical.  From dentists to auto companies.  That’s the big story.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Forbes

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Russian House 3D Printed in 24 Hours

Futurism reports on a stunning breakthrough for the world of 3D printing.  A residential home in Russia was 3D printed in 24 hours for just a little over $10,000.

This beautiful abode was developed and 3D printed by Russian company Apis Cor., “dedicated to building the world with printing.”  The house was printed in the town Stupino, a region just outside Moscow.

“Construction took [a mere] 24 freezing hours [in December of 2016], through temperatures of   -35C degrees (-31F degrees).  The home, equipped with a living room, kitchen, bathroom, and a hallway, was made on-site, a world’s first for 3D printed buildings constructed in that amount of time.”  This 38-square-meter (409-square-foot) marvel cost $10,134 to create, “including the expenses of work, materials for the construction, and furnishing.  That’s $275 per square meter, but the company is confident that a square house with a simpler design and averagely priced materials would cost only $223 per square meter.”

As plainly illustrated in Apis Cor.’s video, “the construction of the home was made possible by a mobile 3D printer.  Once the mobile printer had completed the walls, it was removed with a crane manipulator to allow manual workers to come in and finish the job.”

To conclude, Apis Cor. argues “its method of 3D printing homes cuts 70% of costs compared to traditional methods.  The company is prepared to help the construction industry pivot to 3D printing for future homes around the world.”

Image and Video Courtesy of Apis Cor.

Quotes Courtesy of Futurism

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