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The Double Edged Sword of 3D Printing

As with last month, the world of 3D printing has been embroiled in the American debate about guns.  Without further ado, let’s get right into it…

Popular Mechanics reports on social media giant Facebook, which has recently “blocked sites hosting digital blueprints to make guns on 3D printers from using their platform.”

This is as a result of the State Department’s “recent decision to drop charges against the group Defense Distributed’s website DEFCAD.”  As Replicator World has reported previously: “DEFCAD, one of the world’s most prominent distributors of 3D printed gun files, had been facing charges that it had been allowing the transfer of weapons of war overseas. While the State Department has dropped the matter, eight states have raised it, and a judge agreed to temporarily shut down the site, noting that ‘the balance of hardships and the public interest tip sharply’ towards having the sites inoperable.”

Of course, DEFCAD is far from the only website distributing 3D printed gun blueprints.  “CodeIsFreeSpeech is another website which distributes blueprints for guns like Berettas, AR-15s, AR-10s, Rugers, and the gun made entirely from 3D printing, the Liberator.”  Facebook’s ban targets this site as well.

The Firearms Policy Coalition, the “pro-Second Amendment nonprofit” which runs CodeIsFreeSpeech complained about Facebook’s new policy: “what we are experiencing is a complete ban on CodeIsFreeSpeech – not a ‘shadow ban,’ not a reduced newsfeed presence, but a complete and total ban.  Welcome to Facebook North Korea…”  [Emphasis theirs]

For its part, Facebook explained their reasoning upon the announcement of the ban: “sharing instructions on how to print firearms using 3D printers in not allowed under our Community Standards.  In line with our policies, we are removing this content from Facebook.”

Additionally, Facebook claims “it is currently working on strengthening its stance against 3D printed guns, although it has not provided any additional examples.”

Elsewhere, NPR has recently waded in on the 3D printed gun question.  The radio juggernaut interviewed several 3D printing companies [and their owners/operators] concerning their thoughts and policies concerning 3D printed gun blueprints.

Indeed, “some companies are using gun-blocking software to deter people from printing functional guns…major 3D printing company Sculpteo has banned firearm printing, saying it doesn’t want to be associated with weapon manufacturing.  And Materialise, a publicly traded 3D printing manufacturer and software developer, has launched a feature to block the production of guns.”

This is all because, as Law Professor Tom Baker at the University of Pennsylvania explains, “the idea of a plastic gun slipping through a metal detector is a real fear.  And if a 3D printed gun got in the wrong and someone used it to carry out violence, there could be an avalanche of lawsuits brought against the makers of 3D printing machines.”

Now, however, even “lawmakers” in Washington are pretending to do something about this: “two bills have been introduced in the Senate ‘hoping’ to make it harder for people to use printers to create fully functional guns.”

However, there are some who were interviewed by NPR who describe the entire situation as, to quote the Bard: “a whole bunch of sound and fury, signifying nothing.”  Walt Barger, who is Manager of Printing Operations at high-tech makerspace company NextFab in Philadelphia, explains: “the threat is being overblown.  Printing out a fully functional 3D printed gun isn’t a cakewalk.  You might have to spend $10,000 on a printer.  You need technical chops and hours and hours of trial and error.”

Max Lobovsky, who is CEO of Formlabs, “a billion-dollar 3D printing company out of Massachusetts” adds: “the day when making a homemade gun takes hitting the play button on a desktop 3D printer is far away from now.  I don’t think anyone is particularly close [to producing a fully functional 3D printed firearm.]  I mean, I think at least 10 to 15 years.”

Still, worry looms over the question…

For the last few Replicator World issues, we have been forced to tackle and wrestle with such complicated and nuanced discussions revolving around digital designs for 3D printed firearms – and what this means for the future of 3D printing, policy, and open source culture.  We’ve seen arguments from both sides rear their heads in the wake of the U.S. State Department’s decision to reach an agreement with Defense Distributed.

These arguments and discussions are important to have – and this is why we have chosen to focus on them during these past few issues.  However, every once in a while, (or, more often, as the case usually is) – it is vital to also focus on the fun aspects of 3D printing.  The potential for 3D printing in other arenas: such as art and sculpture.

This is where Australian YouTuber Jazza (Josiah Brooks) comes in.  Jazza is an artist and YouTuber who makes content online focused around making art in a creative, entertaining, and informative way.  Jazza focuses on the ways technology (VR, 3D printing, etc…) can bring this all to pass.  As of this article, his ‘Draw with Jazza’ YouTube channel has 3 million subscribers and he has become one of the leaders of the art community there.

Over the last few months, Jazza has taken a deep (and often amusing) dive into 3D printing – where he learned about the medium (primarily from his local Australian 3D Printer Superstore), bought supplies (such as filament) and began making experiments with this technology.  In his two videos (so far) on the subject (which you can find just below) – he has 3D printed two hulk models – one bite size – and one a little bigger.  In Jazza’s first 3D printing video, he actually completes the 3D prints (after much trial and error), while in the second video he paints his 3D printed figurines.

We here at Replicator World are very excited to see what Jazza does with this boundless artistic medium (for that is just one aspect of 3D printing) next!

And finally, let us leave you with even more joy:

Late in July, at the famous San Diego Comic Con, thirteen-year old Star Wars fan Vedant Singhania got to pilot an X-Wing – of sorts – courtesy of Massivit 3D, Magic Wheelchair, Pixologic Inc., Monster City Studios, and Dangling Carrot Creative.

Massivit 3D, “the leading provider of large format 3D printing solutions for visual communication [with the help of Singhania] unveiled the ‘world’s first’ 3D printed Poe Dameron X-Wing Fighter charity wheelchair costume.”

Singhania’s costume was the result of a vision by non-profit Magic Wheelchair, which “provides bespoke costumes to kids with wheelchairs at no cost to their families.”  Pixologic Inc. was responsible for the X-Wing’s design and modelling while Dangling Carrot Creative 3D printed the costume using a Massivit 1800 3D Printer.  As for Monster City Studios, they completed the assembly and finish.

“Utilizing the high print speeds and dual print heads of its Massivit 1800 3D Printer, Dangling Carrot Creative produced 50 individual costume pieces in just over two weeks.  The 2.44m-high and 3m-long (8’ x 10’) [starfighter] provides [Singhania] with his very own Star Wars X-Wing fighter jet, crafted by some of the original Lucasfilm prop fabricators.”  This way, the entire project was able to eliminate the need for molds or casting, which saved both time and money.

Massivit 3D’s CEO Avner Israeli explains: “this project has been an extraordinary opportunity to test the true value of our technology and to put young [Singhania] in the spotlight for the right reasons.  There’s nothing quite so wonderful as bringing joy to a child.”

Singhania said it best himself: “it’s mind-blowing.  I didn’t expect the costume to be so big and I’m thrilled it’s an X-Wing Fighter because I love Star Wars.  I was really excited during the parade.  I was so happy because all the people were taking pictures of me.  It made me feel like a celebrity.”

That’s the greatness of 3D printing.  Even if some aspects of the industry can (and often do) stray into potentially worrying territory: the joy and possibility of the industry can always remind you of why the technology can be so wonderful.

Image Courtesy of Massivit 3D

Quotes Courtesy of Popular Mechanics, NPR, and Massivit 3D

Videos Courtesy of Draw with Jazza

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Facebook Bans 3D Printed Gun Blueprints Sites

Popular Mechanics reports on social media giant Facebook, which has recently “blocked sites hosting digital blueprints to make guns on 3D printers from using their platform.”

This is as a result of the State Department’s “recent decision to drop charges against the group Defense Distributed’s website DEFCAD.”  As Replicator World has reported previously: “DEFCAD, one of the world’s most prominent distributors of 3D printed gun files, had been facing charges that it had been allowing the transfer of weapons of war overseas. While the State Department has dropped the matter, eight states have raised it, and a judge agreed to temporarily shut down the site, noting that ‘the balance of hardships and the public interest tip sharply’ towards having the sites inoperable.”

Of course, DEFCAD is far from the only website distributing 3D printed gun blueprints.  “CodeIsFreeSpeech is another website which distributes blueprints for guns like Berettas, AR-15s, AR-10s, Rugers, and the gun made entirely from 3D printing, the Liberator.”  Facebook’s ban targets this site as well.

The Firearms Policy Coalition, the “pro-Second Amendment nonprofit” which runs CodeIsFreeSpeech complained about Facebook’s new policy: “what we are experiencing is a complete ban on CodeIsFreeSpeech – not a ‘shadow ban,’ not a reduced newsfeed presence, but a complete and total ban.  Welcome to Facebook North Korea…”  [Emphasis theirs]

For its part, Facebook explained their reasoning upon the announcement of the ban: “sharing instructions on how to print firearms using 3D printers in not allowed under our Community Standards.  In line with our policies, we are removing this content from Facebook.”

Additionally, Facebook claims “it is currently working on strengthening its stance against 3D printed guns, although it has not provided any additional examples.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Popular Mechanics

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Veterans Affairs Developing 3D Printed Artificial Lung

As reported by 3DPrint, researchers at the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Health Care System in Michigan “are developing a 3D printed artificial lung, which would be used to help treat veterans affected by lung disease.”

Indeed, 16% “of the veteran population suffers from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)…Some of the most common factors leading to lung issues for active-duty military include exposure to burn pits, chemicals, diesel exhaust, and sand.”

Now, however, there is hope.  This Michigan-based team led by biomedical engineer Dr. Joseph Potkay “have long been researching the advantages of using microfabrication to build artificial lungs with efficient gas exchange and blood paths similar to those in human lungs.”  Dr. Potkay even developed a 2D printed artificial lung prototype in 2011.

Dr. Potkay says “the 3D printed version currently in the works will provide the same basic advantages.  With the freedom afforded by being able to design the device in three dimensions instead of two, 3D printing should result in artificial lungs with a smaller overall footprint and with increased efficiency.  Thus, portability and performance will potentially improve using 3D printing.”

These 3D printed artificial lungs will be about a half-inch “cube in size, hopefully able to fit in a backpack, and be used for a week; however, after further development, the hope is to get the lung to work for longer amounts of time.”  These devices will thus be far more portable and far less bulky than their present day predecessors.

“The goal behind the VA research is to create the first truly wearable artificial lung that’s compatible with living tissue and can provide both short and long-term respiratory support, and microfluidic artificial lungs also use far less blood than current commercial devices do.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3DPrint

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NPR Wades In On The 3D Printed Gun Question

NPR has recently waded in on the 3D printed gun question.  The radio juggernaut interviewed several 3D printing companies [and their owners/operators] concerning their thoughts and policies concerning 3D printed gun blueprints.

Indeed, “some companies are using gun-blocking software to deter people from printing functional guns…major 3D printing company Sculpteo has banned firearm printing, saying it doesn’t want to be associated with weapon manufacturing.  And Materialise, a publicly traded 3D printing manufacturer and software developer, has launched a feature to block the production of guns.”

This is all because, as Law Professor Tom Baker at the University of Pennsylvania explains, “the idea of a plastic gun slipping through a metal detector is a real fear.  And if a 3D printed gun got in the wrong and someone used it to carry out violence, there could be an avalanche of lawsuits brought against the makers of 3D printing machines.”

Now, however, even “lawmakers” in Washington are pretending to do something about this: “two bills have been introduced in the Senate ‘hoping’ to make it harder for people to use printers to create fully functional guns.”

However, there are some who were interviewed by NPR who describe the entire situation as, to quote the Bard: “a whole bunch of sound and fury, signifying nothing.”  Walt Barger, who is Manager of Printing Operations at high-tech makerspace company NextFab in Philadelphia, explains: “the threat is being overblown.  Printing out a fully functional 3D printed gun isn’t a cakewalk.  You might have to spend $10,000 on a printer.  You need technical chops and hours and hours of trial and error.”

Max Lobovsky, who is CEO of Formlabs, “a billion-dollar 3D printing company out of Massachusetts” adds: “the day when making a homemade gun takes hitting the play button on a desktop 3D printer is far away from now.  I don’t think anyone is particularly close [to producing a fully functional 3D printed firearm.]  I mean, I think at least 10 to 15 years.”

Still, worry looms over the question…

Image and Quotes Courtesy of NPR

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AI System for 3D Printing Process Monitoring

As reported by 3D Printing Industry, a team of researchers at Kansas State University have recently released an article in the scientific journal Procedia Manufacturing, in which they detail their development of an AI system for the purposes of monitoring 3D printing processes.

These researchers, from the school’s Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (IMSE), have developed this system using “integrated supervised machine learning, a camera, and image processing software.”  This system is now able to “assess 3D printed parts in real-time.”

As the researchers’ article explains: “Conventionally, the quality of 3D printed parts is being checked after the printing is done. Detecting defects during the printing process not only helps to eliminate waste of material and time but also prevent the need to reprint the whole part.”

Indeed, the researchers’ system “demonstrates that with the use of step-by-step quality checks, production-scale 3D printing operations can be improved with cost and time efficiency.”  The researchers used a LulzBot Mini 3D printer during their study.

As for the process itself, “the researchers proposed a three-step quality monitoring system to identify and assess the stages of the 3D printing process.  Firstly, the researchers established checkpoints for a 3D printed part according to its geometry. Secondly, with the help of a mounted camera, images were taken of the semi-finished parts at each checkpoint.  Finally, part quality was automatically assessed through image processing and a supervised machine learning algorithm called a support vector machine (SVM).”

This system can detect both completion failure defects or geometrical defects.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry

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P-rouette: Partially 3D Printed Ballet Shoes

Dezeen just recently caught wind of a brand new 3D printed-infused design for ballet shoes.  Hadar Neeman, who graduated from the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem, has developed P-rouette: “a personalized ballet shoe using 3D printing technology to reduce dancers’ pain.”

“The reimagined ballet shoe is adapted to fit the user’s foot, providing comfort and protection, with the result three times more durable than traditional ballet shoes.”  As Neeman describes, she was searching for a way to apply methods of 3D printed fabrics “when she noticed the bruised feet and crooked toes of a ballet dancing friend.”  Here, she saw a brand new opportunity for 3D printed fabrics.

As Neeman explains: “I learned about pointe shoes and the more I got into the field, the more I realized there was a lot of potential for improving the existing show and improving the quality of life of the dancers.”

And so – Neeman got to work developing her shoe, which is “made in a multistep process.  First the dancer’s foot is scanned, then a detailed map of the shoe is created on a computer.  The dancer can scan their foot using a mobile phone app.  The sole is modelled using a lightweight, airy lattice-structure to perfectly fit the contours of the foot.  The upper part of the pointe shoe is cut on a special shoemaker’s last.”

The shoe’s sole is created using “a printed elastomeric polymer and the shoe body is made of an elastic, satin-like material.”  Before Neeman’s wonderful invention, most pointe shoes have been handmade “using traditional techniques…the shoes only last through 10 hours of dancing…[Neeman’s] shoes last three times longer than their traditional counterparts.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Dezeen

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XYZprinting Announces da Vinci Color Mini

3D Printing Industry caught wind of a new announcement made by XYZprinting, the Tawainese manufacturers of the da Vinci line of desktop 3D printers.  Apparently, the company has just announced the release of a new full-color 3D printer: the da Vinci Color mini.

Designed with “STEM students, film model makers, and toymakers” in mind, the da Vinci Color mini is capable of producing “realistic prototypes [using its] Color Jet Printing (CJP) technology, which combines inkjet printing with fused filament fabrication (FFF) to create a range of colorful prints allowing designers to vividly envision their final product without having to paint it.”

As CEO of XYZprinting Simon Shen expounds: “desktop full-color 3D printing is here.  Now, consumers can purchase an easy-to-operate, affordable, compact full-color 3D printer for $30,000 less than market rate.  This is revolutionary because we are giving the public access to technology once available only to industry professionals.”

The da Vinci Color mini comes chock-full of features.  Indeed, the 3D printer “includes a hands-free auto calibration, an EZ removable print bed, WiFi connectivity, and a 5-inch color LCD screen.  Its ‘full-color’ 3D printing abilities reportedly provide over 15 million color combinations from new 3-in-1 CMY ink cartridges.  Using its 3DColorJet technology, the da Vinci Color mini mixes and spreads droplets of colored ink from printer ink cartridges between designated layers of PLA, creating a multi-colored 3D printed model.”

The da Vinci Color mini, which ships to backers in October (of 2018), will retail for a price of $1599.95, but pre-orderers will get a discount for $999.95.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry

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3D Printed Miniaturized Batteries: Longer Lasting?

Forbes reports on a brand new study just recently published by Carnegie Mellon University’s College of Engineering.  Apparently, these researchers “have come up with a new method of fabricating batter electrodes using Aerosol Jet 3D printing.  The Aerosol Jet system also allows the researchers to print planar sensors and other electronics on a micro-scale.”

As the researchers explain: “currently, the electrode materials of lithium-ion batteries are mixed with a glue-like substance called binders which are pressed onto electrodes and physically kept apart by a polymer separator. These pressed electrodes have a block geometry which means that 30 to 50% of the electrode isn’t utilized, reducing capacity.”

Now, “due to lower weight and higher capacity of the 3D printed batteries, they can be used more efficiently in small drones, smartphones, medical devices, and aerospace industries, as well as biomedical electronic devices.”  This will all be due to the high demand for miniaturized batteries.

Thanks to this new method developed by the researchers at Carnegie Mellon, “it will now be possible to 3D print the battery electrodes by assembling individual droplets one-by-one into three-dimensional structures.  The stress in the 3D printed electrodes is now distributed uniformly versus traditional methods of uneven distribution in block electrodes.”

This is great news for the average consumer because “this new method of 3D printing these micro-lattice batteries can reduce charging times and increase capacity” within the batteries.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Forbes

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Tethon 3D to Develop Process for Ceramic and Metal 3D Printing

TCT Magazine has recently reported on an announcement make by Tethon 3D.  The company’s latest project aims “to produce and commercialize a desktop digital light processing (DLP) system designed to print ceramic and metal materials.”

This project is being funded by a grant made by the Nebraska Department of Economic Development to Tethon 3D.  While several DLP and stereolithography (SLA) machines “are compatible with Tethon’s ten ceramic and metal resins…all of those machines have been designed primarily for plastic polymers.  By developing a printing system which is optimized for its own ceramic and metal materials, Tethon 3D believes users can benefit from better quality parts and increased scalability.”

As Tethon 3D’s CEO Karen Linder explains: “our printer will create new opportunities for designers to develop complex ceramic and metal components and will enable higher volume manufacturing of 3D printed ceramics and metals.  We are passionate about creating new markets, fabricating designs that were previously impossible and disrupting existing manufacturing approaches.”

In order to help move these project along, Tethon 3D will be created a new hardware division within their company.  This division “will work side by side with the University of Nebraska’s Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering.”

Jeffrey E. Shield, who is Chair of the Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering and Robert W. Brightfelt Professor of Engineering at the University of Nebraska, concludes: “the Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering is excited for this opportunity to work with Tethon 3D on developing 3D printing technology.  [Our professors] have the complementary expertise to contribute to this project in a number of ways, and Tethon 3D is a recognized leader in developing outstanding technology.  It will be a great opportunity for our faculty and students to interact with such an outstanding company.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Tethon 3D and TCT Magazine

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YouTuber Jazza Tries 3D Printing For The First Time

For the last few Replicator World issues, we have been forced to tackle and wrestle with such complicated and nuanced discussions revolving around digital designs for 3D printed firearms – and what this means for the future of 3D printing, policy, and open source culture.  We’ve seen arguments from both sides rear their heads in the wake of the U.S. State Department’s decision to reach an agreement with Defense Distributed.

These arguments and discussions are important to have – and this is why we have chosen to focus on them during these past few issues.  However, every once in a while, (or, more often, as the case usually is) – it is vital to also focus on the fun aspects of 3D printing.  The potential for 3D printing in other arenas: such as art and sculpture.

This is where Australian YouTuber Jazza (Josiah Brooks) comes in.  Jazza is an artist and YouTuber who makes content online focused around making art in a creative, entertaining, and informative way.  Jazza focuses on the ways technology (VR, 3D printing, etc…) can bring this all to pass.  As of this article, his ‘Draw with Jazza’ YouTube channel has 3 million subscribers and he has become one of the leaders of the art community there.

Over the last few months, Jazza has taken a deep (and often amusing) dive into 3D printing – where he learned about the medium (primarily from his local Australian 3D Printer Superstore), bought supplies (such as filament) and began making experiments with this technology.  In his two videos (so far) on the subject (which you can find just below) – he has 3D printed two hulk models – one bite size – and one a little bigger.  In Jazza’s first 3D printing video, he actually completes the 3D prints (after much trial and error), while in the second video he paints his 3D printed figurines.

We here at Replicator World are very excited to see what Jazza does with this boundless artistic medium (for that is just one aspect of 3D printing) next!

Image and Videos Courtesy of Draw with Jazza

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3D Printed Treatment for Spinal Cord Injuries

Science Daily reports on a recent article from the scientific journal Advanced Functional Materials.  Researchers at the University of Minnesota have developed a “groundbreaking 3D printed device, which could someday help patients with long-term spinal cord injuries regain some [critical] functions.”

This device, which the researchers are referring to as a 3D printed guide, is made from silicone and “serves as a platform for specialized cells, which are then 3D printed on top of it.  The guide would be surgically implanted into the injured area of the spinal cord where it would serve as a type of ‘bridge’ between living nerve cells above and below the area of injury.  The hope is this would help patients alleviate pain as well as regain some [critical functions such as] control of muscles, bowel, and bladder.”

As University of Minnesota Benjamin Mayhugh Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the University’s College of Science and Engineering Michael McAlpine, Ph.D., explains: “this is the first time anyone has been able to directly 3D print neuronal stem cells derived from adult human cells on a 3D printed guide and have the cells differentiate into active nerve cells in the lab.”

“In this new process…researchers start with any kind of cell from an adult, such as a skin cell or blood cell. Using new bioengineering techniques, the medical researchers are able to reprogram the cells into neuronal stem cells. The engineers print these cells onto a silicone guide using a unique 3D-printing technology in which the same 3D printer is used to print both the guide and the cells. The guide keeps the cells alive and allows them to change into neurons. The team developed a prototype guide that would be surgically implanted into the damaged part of the spinal cord and help connect living cells on each side of the injury.”

Co-author of the study and University of Minnesota Medical School Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery and Stem Cell Institute Ann Parr, M.D., Ph.D., really brings the value of this research down to earth: “we’ve found relaying any signals across the injury could improve functions for the patients.  There’s a perception people with spinal cord injuries will only be happy if they can walk again.  In reality, most want simple things like bladder control or to be able to stop uncontrollable movements of their legs.  These simple improvements in function could greatly improve their lives.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Science Daily and the University of Minnesota

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3D Printed Star Wars Wheelchair Cosplay


Late in July, at the famous San Diego Comic Con, thirteen-year old Star Wars fan Vedant Singhania got to pilot an X-Wing – of sorts – courtesy of Massivit 3D, Magic Wheelchair, Pixologic Inc., Monster City Studios, and Dangling Carrot Creative.

Massivit 3D, “the leading provider of large format 3D printing solutions for visual communication [with the help of Singhania] unveiled the ‘world’s first’ 3D printed Poe Dameron X-Wing Fighter charity wheelchair costume.”

Singhania’s costume was the result of a vision by non-profit Magic Wheelchair, which “provides bespoke costumes to kids with wheelchairs at no cost to their families.”  Pixologic Inc. was responsible for the X-Wing’s design and modelling while Dangling Carrot Creative 3D printed the costume using a Massivit 1800 3D Printer.  As for Monster City Studios, they completed the assembly and finish.

“Utilizing the high print speeds and dual print heads of its Massivit 1800 3D Printer, Dangling Carrot Creative produced 50 individual costume pieces in just over two weeks.  The 2.44m-high and 3m-long (8’ x 10’) [starfighter] provides [Singhania] with his very own Star Wars X-Wing fighter jet, crafted by some of the original Lucasfilm prop fabricators.”  This way, the entire project was able to eliminate the need for molds or casting, which saved both time and money.

Massivit 3D’s CEO Avner Israeli explains: “this project has been an extraordinary opportunity to test the true value of our technology and to put young [Singhania] in the spotlight for the right reasons.  There’s nothing quite so wonderful as bringing joy to a child.”

Singhania said it best himself: “it’s mind-blowing.  I didn’t expect the costume to be so big and I’m thrilled it’s an X-Wing Fighter because I love Star Wars.  I was really excited during the parade.  I was so happy because all the people were taking pictures of me.  It made me feel like a celebrity.”

Image, Video, and Quotes Courtesy of Massivit 3D

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