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3D Printing in October of 2019

We begin our tour of the additive manufacturing industry this month in England.

3D Printing Industry reports Graphite AM, which is a British engineering service bureau and consultancy firm, has joined the Bloodhound LSR supersonic car project as “an official 3D printing partner.”

Graphite AM will apply “its SLS expertise and support the team’s ambitious goal of breaking the land speed record by supplying lightweight and high strength parts for the vehicle.” A company spokesperson elaborated: “we at Graphite AM have been delighted to be supporting the Bloodhound SSC project and have built an array of parts large and small. We are a small cog in a very big wheel and are proud to be supporting the project.”

This news comes on the heels of the Bloodhound team “confirming they would be trying for a 500 mph test run in October following the successful acquisition and relaunch by Yorkshire businessman Ian Warhurst in March this year.”

The Bloodhound LSR pilot and current World Land Speed Record Holder Andy Green “praised the manufacturing methods being applied to help the team reach above 1000 mph on land.” Green says, “even something as simple as a piece of ducting tells a fascinating story about the cutting edge technology being used in Bloodhound…[the SLS technology] produces a tough, high-temperature-resistant component in almost any shape. Just what we need, as this is very much next-generation technology.”

The Bloodhound is “powered by two engines – one a Rolls-Royce jet engine and the other a hybrid rocket thruster…so far, as of 2017, the Bloodhound LSR has completed its first recorded runway test attaining a speed of 200 miles per hour. Ramping up this effort, the vehicle has now been cleared for a 500 mph run on the Hakskeen Pan in South Africa. Once this stage is complete, the team intends to tackle the record-breaking 1000 mph mark in late 2020.”

Elsewhere in Europe, Interesting Engineering reports on the conclusion of a story we have been following for quite some time.

3D printing company Vertico, in conjunction with the University of Ghent, has finally completed their 3D printed concrete bridge. Vertico is incredibly excited by this development, as “this process eliminates the need for expensive molds and more importantly provides more form freedom to structures.”

Vertico’s Founder, Volker Ruitinga, explains: “this bridge showcases the range of possibilities 3D concrete printing offers. At Vertico, we believe this technology is the key to unlocking material optimization in structures, reducing CO2 emissions whilst simultaneously increasing productivity in the construction industry.”

The construction industry, understandably, is awed by this innovation. Indeed, “building concrete structures out of a 3D printer is revolutionary for an industry, which has long lagged behind others in terms of automation and production.” As Vertico elaborates, “there is a need for innovation in an industry which produces 23% of global CO2 emissions. This isn’t to say this industry does not seek innovation, just that it’s often just too costly to build unique forms and organic shapes with traditional techniques.”

Vertico goes on to add: “this project demonstrates the possibilities of the technique on a relevant and significant scale. The advantages of 3D (concrete) printing are being increasingly recognized and with this acceptance we will see more and more building and infrastructure projects such as this optimized bridge. The desire for material/CO2 reduction, automation productivity trends, and cost-effective production requirements make 3D concrete printing an innovation with a lot of potential.”

Next, Vertico is focusing on the construction of a 3D printed concrete dome house, which will begin production in February of 2020.

And what about shoes to walk on said 3D printed bridge? 3D Printing Media Network reports on the launch of a new generative 3D printed show collection developed by Ica & Kostika. Ica & Kostika is “a Portland-based emerging design studio accentuating the fusion of fashion design and technology. The studio highlights exclusive made-to-order production while focusing on computational innovation.”

Ica & Kostika’s branding copy is flavorful, to say the least: “fueled by passion, love, beauty, and brought to life by combining art and the highest levels of mathematics, we have forged our heels – the designers say on their website. Disruption is at the core of existence. The big bang disrupted time and space, within every one of us there is longing for disruption. This is our way.”

The studio’s new 3D printed shoe collection consists of four different groupings: each “available on-demand, in different styles, and in both metal and plastic. The core designs are inspired by sea-life and life-bearing structures in general and include Coral, Seahorse, Mycelium, and Spine.”

“The Spine design is available either as Spine DIY or Spine Metal. Starting at $800, the Spine DIY are a wearable shoe sculpture that manipulates the vertebrae of the spine to create a continuous form along the foot. Like other designs, this plastic version is 3D printed in nylon using a selective laser sintering process.”

“The partner AM service provide puts it into production upon receiving the order. The shipped shoes are not finished and the studio recommends getting a finishing cover done locally.”

Spine Metal, however, starts at $2,800. These shoes are 3D printed using steel, in a “binder jetting process, which is later infused with bronze, creating a material made from 60% steel and 40% bronze.”

This 3D printed shoe collection is sure to impress…

Finally, Forbes recently ran an interesting discussion concerning the possibility of 3D printed weapons of mass destruction being created in the near future. This discussion was kicked off by a recent report: “WMD Capabilities Enabled by Additive Manufacturing,” which was sponsored by the Negotiation Design & Strategy, LLC (NDS).

Forbes kicked off its discussion by referring back to the legal wranglings which have been occurring concerning 3D printed guns: the company Defense Distributed in the thick of it all… As the article says: “controlling access to guns and weapons is difficult. But controlling the access to data, all that is needed to print your own weapon, may be impossible. Now, imagine instead of a handgun, anyone with a 3D printer can print out a Weapon of Mass Destruction (WMD).”

Within Negotiation Design & Strategy’s report, the authors warn: “with the proper blueprints, WMD could be printed by rogue states, terrorists, and even those who have never had the ability to research/create such weaponry before.” As for how these “rogue agents” would get a hold of plutonium in the first place, the report never outlines…

The discussion goes on, however: “the development of missile systems or other delivery systems might be the most impacted by 3D printing. There might be other applications in chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons. 3D printing is being used currently for printing parts for fuel assemblies in nuclear reactors, parts for missiles, warheads, and even explosives.”

Seeing how unreliable and difficult to create 3D printed guns are right now, though, it seems difficult to imagine a WMD being produced in a similar manner. However, the report is correct in heralding this warning. Technology can (and has) continued to improve, especially, as the report outlines, when 3D printing is paired with AI or nanotechnology.

The report “warns the potential for a ‘black swan’-type event involving an AM-centered military program to acquire truly novel unconventional/asymmetric military capabilities cannot be ruled out.”

Strategies will have to be developed in order to combat these possibilities in the future.

Stay here for more 3D printing updates.

Image Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry

Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry, Vertico, Interesting Engineering, Ice & Kostika, 3D Printing Media Network, and Forbes

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3D Printed Homes for the Homeless

KXAN in Austin, Texas reports on a new 3D printed housing initiative launched by ICON. Based in Austin, the company ICON just recently “unveiled a new welcome center…for a local community which houses the chronically homeless – and it’s the second 3D printed home [they have printed] in their city.”

Additionally, “ICON’s Vulcan II 3D printer will soon be creating housing for area homeless at Community First! Village located in Travis County, which is east of Austin.” In partnership with Austin nonprofit Mobile Loaves & Fishes, which is the nonprofit behind Community First!, ICON “was commissioned by Cielo Property Group to print the nearly 500-square-foot welcome center. Cielo is paying for this printer to be used to build out other homes in this community as well, six more homes are expected to be printed in the near future.”

3D printing these homes takes “less than 27 hours over the course of several days,” according to ICON. “Using this printer to build out more homes will help fulfill Phase II of developing Mobile Loaves & Fishes plan for Community First! Village. Mobile Loaves & Fishes hopes to have 110 of these printed homes in their community in the long run.”

As Founder and CEO of Mobile Loaves & Fishes Alan Graham says, “that’s the beauty of the scalability of technology, that’s the beauty of the scalability of innovation. And then when you look at what it takes to actually build a house in a conventional way — a month — and be able to reduce that to days, it’s unbelievable. This is going to create one of the most extraordinary movements in the United States of America. ICON is pushing the envelope and is technologically laying out a new way of looking at how we build homes. Community First! Village is the perfect place on the planet to experiment with this approach. One of our desires is that this partnership with ICON will grow so deep that we’re able to leverage this technology to someday build all of our micro-homes in future phases of the Village.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of KXAN

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3D Printing Medical Supplies in Gaza

The magazine Logic recently sat down for a fascinating (and quite wide ranging) interview with Dr. Tarek Loubani. During this interview, Dr. Loubani discussed his work funneling, and often smuggling, medical supplies into Israeli-occupied Gaza. 3D printing is helping bring much needed relief to the Palestinians living there.

To quote the interview’s introduction: “Dr. Tarek Loubani thinks it’s [expletive deleted] up that doctors and nurses have to pay $200 for a stethoscope that can be 3D-printed for $3. The Palestinian-Canadian doctor is an emergency room physician and professor based in London, Ontario, where he has set up a factory in his basement to print more affordable stethoscopes. What’s merely irritating in Ontario presents a more serious barrier to care in Gaza, where Loubani has been taking regular trips since 2011 and where the Israeli and Egyptian blockade ensures that he rarely has access to basic medical equipment like gauze and plastic gloves when he’s there. Reliable access to more expensive equipment is out of the question.”

Due to these horrific circumstances brought about by the occupation, Dr. Loubani “founded the Glia Project to work on the stethoscope problem and the blockade problem at the same time: in the same way drug manufacturers copy brand-name drugs and sell them for less as generics, the Glia Project makes generics of medical hardware. Loubani is also distributing the means of producing that hardware, 3D printers, and training Canadian medical students and regular Gazans to print medical equipment themselves.”

To develop and produce these 3D printed devices, the Glia Project, according to Loubani, “create the designs using FreeCAD, a free/open source CAD software program.” Loubani has six 3D printers running in his basement, “and a few tables where packages for each stethoscope can be quality-checked. A full print job produces enough parts to make four stethoscopes and that takes fifteen hours. In other words, the Glia Project produces four stethoscopes every fifteen hours.”

For the 3D printers the Glia Project are using in Gaza, they are using ABS plastic for the machines’ filament. “Gaza actually has 100 percent recycle rate because no plastic is allowed in.”

The Glia Project has 20 3D printers at their headquarters in Gaza. As Loubani explains, there are two reasons for this: “one is that we want to promote the culture. The other is that we’re going to get bombed at some point. When that happens, if we are the only place that has all the 3D-printing knowledge or equipment, then we’re going to set back the entire movement by two or three years. The more we hoard the knowledge or hoard the equipment, the worse it will be. As it is, when our offices eventually do get bombed, we’ll probably only be set back a year. If somebody dies, obviously it will be even worse. So, while we have twenty printers of our own, we’ve “birthed” approximately thirty-five more by printing parts for them. It’s easier for people to get up and running if we give them some parts to start, kind of like a sourdough starter. But what’s really cool is that printers have started showing up that we had nothing to do with.”

Loubani outlines his vision: “The goal is to get a 3D printer into every high school in Gaza within the next five to ten years. For us to have as many 3D printers as they have in the Netherlands per capita would mean having around two thousand printers. And Gaza needs more printers than the Netherlands because they’re making essential stuff. For example, if your light switch breaks in the Netherlands, it’s usually cheaper and easier to go buy it at the hardware store. In Gaza, these breakages are permanent. When you go to somebody’s house and the light switch is broken, it’s always going to be broken. Introducing 3D printing to that culture is empowering repair culture.”

Finally: “If I were to distribute a stethoscope [produced using traditional manufacturing methods and distribution] to each doctor in Gaza — that’s 4,000 doctors — that would be $200 per stethoscope, but probably more like $350 by the time you got them into Gaza because of the corruption, the problems with the Israelis, and so on. You’re talking about $350 times 4,000 people. That’s really serious cash. And for what? For stethoscopes. Whereas 4,000 3D-printed stethoscopes — even with packaging, distribution, training, and everything — are $5 a pop. For $20,000, you can kickstart an entire medical system. That’s nothing.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Logic Magazine, The Glia Project, and Dr. Tarek Loubani

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3D Printed Weapons of Mass Destruction?

Forbes recently ran an interesting discussion concerning the possibility of 3D printed weapons of mass destruction being created in the near future. This discussion was kicked off by a recent report: “WMD Capabilities Enabled by Additive Manufacturing,” which was sponsored by the Negotiation Design & Strategy, LLC (NDS).

Forbes kicked off its discussion by referring back to the legal wranglings which have been occurring concerning 3D printed guns: the company Defense Distributed in the thick of it all… As the article says: “controlling access to guns and weapons is difficult. But controlling the access to data, all that is needed to print your own weapon, may be impossible. Now, imagine instead of a handgun, anyone with a 3D printer can print out a Weapon of Mass Destruction (WMD).”

Within Negotiation Design & Strategy’s report, the authors warn: “with the proper blueprints, WMD could be printed by rogue states, terrorists, and even those who have never had the ability to research/create such weaponry before.” As for how these “rogue agents” would get a hold of plutonium in the first place, the report never outlines…

The discussion goes on, however: “the development of missile systems or other delivery systems might be the most impacted by 3D printing. There might be other applications in chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons. 3D printing is being used currently for printing parts for fuel assemblies in nuclear reactors, parts for missiles, warheads, and even explosives.”

Seeing how unreliable and difficult to create 3D printed guns are right now, though, it seems difficult to imagine a WMD being produced in a similar manner. However, the report is correct in heralding this warning. Technology can (and has) continued to improve, especially, as the report outlines, when 3D printing is paired with AI or nanotechnology.

The report “warns the potential for a ‘black swan’-type event involving an AM-centered military program to acquire truly novel unconventional/asymmetric military capabilities cannot be ruled out.”

Strategies will have to be developed in order to combat these possibilities in the future.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Forbes

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WPI Receives $25 Million Award for Cold Spray 3D Printing Techniques

Worcester Polytechnic Institute has just recently received a $25 million award “to bring cold spray 3D printing techniques to the battlefield.”

This funding from the US Army “will support advanced work on cold spray. This portable repair and manufacturing technique could increase the readiness of military vehicles and other units.”

This three-year, $25 million award from the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Army Research Laboratory (CCDC-ARL) will “advance a 3D printing technique which could be used to repair vehicles and other critical technology in the field, avoiding the sometimes-extensive wait for new parts and increasing the readiness of military units.”

This technique is known as cold spray, “which can be used to repair metal parts or even make new parts from scratch by building up metal layer by layer…cold spray uses a pressurized gas to accelerate metal powders to near supersonic speeds. The force of impact causes the powders to adhere to the metal upon impact. There is no need to first melt the powders. The process can be reduced to a portable handheld applicator, which makes it attractive for use in the field.”

Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Director of WPI’s Center for Materials Processing Data Danielle Cote explains: “the Army is interested in cold spray 3D printing as a repair technique. It’s cheaper to repair a part than to replace it, and you get the equipment back in service faster. The Army’s primary interest is unit readiness. If you’re on a mission and need to move quickly to a safer place, and a critical part on your vehicle breaks, you’re stuck unless you can repair it quickly. This is where cold spray comes in.”

Cote concludes: “I think there is much potential for this technique. With the work we will be doing with powder development, in robotics, and in a number of other areas, I think we are going to go a long way with cold spray. There really are endless possibilities.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Worcester Polytechnic Institute

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Graphite AM Joins Bloodhound LSR Team

3D Printing Industry reports Graphite AM, which is a British engineering service bureau and consultancy firm, has joined the Bloodhound LSR supersonic car project as “an official 3D printing partner.”

Graphite AM will apply “its SLS expertise and support the team’s ambitious goal of breaking the land speed record by supplying lightweight and high strength parts for the vehicle.” A company spokesperson elaborated: “we at Graphite AM have been delighted to be supporting the Bloodhound SSC project and have built an array of parts large and small. We are a small cog in a very big wheel and are proud to be supporting the project.”

This news comes on the heels of the Bloodhound team “confirming they would be trying for a 500 mph test run in October following the successful acquisition and relaunch by Yorkshire businessman Ian Warhurst in March this year.”

The Bloodhound LSR pilot and current World Land Speed Record Holder Andy Green “praised the manufacturing methods being applied to help the team reach above 1000 mph on land.” Green says, “even something as simple as a piece of ducting tells a fascinating story about the cutting edge technology being used in Bloodhound…[the SLS technology] produces a tough, high-temperature-resistant component in almost any shape. Just what we need, as this is very much next-generation technology.”

The Bloodhound is “powered by two engines – one a Rolls-Royce jet engine and the other a hybrid rocket thruster…so far, as of 2017, the Bloodhound LSR has completed its first recorded runway test attaining a speed of 200 miles per hour. Ramping up this effort, the vehicle has now been cleared for a 500 mph run on the Hakskeen Pan in South Africa. Once this stage is complete, the team intends to tackle the record-breaking 1000 mph mark in late 2020.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry

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3D Printed Concrete Bridge Completed

Interesting Engineering reports on the conclusion of a story we have been following for quite some time.

3D printing company Vertico, in conjunction with the University of Ghent, has finally completed their 3D printed concrete bridge. Vertico is incredibly excited by this development, as “this process eliminates the need for expensive molds and more importantly provides more form freedom to structures.”

Vertico’s Founder, Volker Ruitinga, explains: “this bridge showcases the range of possibilities 3D concrete printing offers. At Vertico, we believe this technology is the key to unlocking material optimization in structures, reducing CO2 emissions whilst simultaneously increasing productivity in the construction industry.”

The construction industry, understandably, is awed by this innovation. Indeed, “building concrete structures out of a 3D printer is revolutionary for an industry, which has long lagged behind others in terms of automation and production.” As Vertico elaborates, “there is a need for innovation in an industry which produces 23% of global CO2 emissions. This isn’t to say this industry does not seek innovation, just that it’s often just too costly to build unique forms and organic shapes with traditional techniques.”

Vertico goes on to add: “this project demonstrates the possibilities of the technique on a relevant and significant scale. The advantages of 3D (concrete) printing are being increasingly recognized and with this acceptance we will see more and more building and infrastructure projects such as this optimized bridge. The desire for material/CO2 reduction, automation productivity trends, and cost-effective production requirements make 3D concrete printing an innovation with a lot of potential.”

Next, Vertico is focusing on the construction of a 3D printed concrete dome house, which will begin production in February of 2020.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Vertico and Interesting Engineering

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3D Printing and Forensic Science

Sky News reports on a fascinating development for 3D printing: being used in forensic science in order to help solve murders!

Indeed, “the latest technology in digital scanning and 3D printing is providing vital clues and evidence in murder cases.”

“Post-mortems provide crucial information on the cause of death and CT scanning in hospitals can provide evidence. But the latest scans by the Centre For Imaging, Metrology, and Additive Technology at the University of Warwick are 100% more detailed, detecting very small injuries, which would be missed by conventional equipment.”

Additionally, the team is also able “to produce 3D renderings of injuries, even the so-called ‘micro-injuries’ not detected by conventional scanners, and the age of the injuries can also be determined, which assists pathologists in determining whether they were a consequence of the incident in question.”

Further along down the legal line, this 3D printed and scanned “evidence can be used in trials to help visualize trauma to the jury and support the pathologist’s testimony.” This has already been done with at least one criminal case.

Indeed, “micro-CT equipment and analysis was used to find evidence in the case of the death of nine-week-old Teri-Rae Palmer, whose mother Abigail Palmer was found guilty of manslaughter and wounding and sentenced to 13-and-a-half years in jail.”

“3D x-ray scanners allowed the team to identify multiple fractures to Teri-Rae’s ribs, which had occurred over an extended period of time. The ability to produce highly detailed 3D images of these shocking injuries which could be presented at court helped establish the truth and show what had happened.”

On top of this, “the team have worked on murder cases identifying who was responsible for the death in instances where more than one person was involved. In one case in which a hammer and a spanner were used as weapons, both assailants claimed innocence and work from the CT scans helped show both were guilty.”

Finally, this technology is not only being used for criminal cases. For example, “scanners were also used to make replicas of the famous dodo at the Oxford University Natural History Museum. During this investigation, they discovered the animal had been shot, with lead found throughout the skull.”

The team hopes to focus future work “on industrial forensics, including airplane and car failures, through to developing implants for human medicine such as hip implants.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Sky News

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3D Printed Shoe Collection: In Metal & Plastic

3D Printing Media Network reports on the launch of a new generative 3D printed show collection developed by Ica & Kostika. Ica & Kostika is “a Portland-based emerging design studio accentuating the fusion of fashion design and technology. The studio highlights exclusive made-to-order production while focusing on computational innovation.”

Ica & Kostika’s branding copy is flavorful, to say the least: “fueled by passion, love, beauty, and brought to life by combining art and the highest levels of mathematics, we have forged our heels – the designers say on their website. Disruption is at the core of existence. The big bang disrupted time and space, within every one of us there is longing for disruption. This is our way.”

The studio’s new 3D printed shoe collection consists of four different groupings: each “available on-demand, in different styles, and in both metal and plastic. The core designs are inspired by sea-life and life-bearing structures in general and include Coral, Seahorse, Mycelium, and Spine.”

“The Spine design is available either as Spine DIY or Spine Metal. Starting at $800, the Spine DIY are a wearable shoe sculpture that manipulates the vertebrae of the spine to create a continuous form along the foot. Like other designs, this plastic version is 3D printed in nylon using a selective laser sintering process.”

“The partner AM service provide puts it into production upon receiving the order. The shipped shoes are not finished and the studio recommends getting a finishing cover done locally.”

Spine Metal, however, starts at $2,800. These shoes are 3D printed using steel, in a “binder jetting process, which is later infused with bronze, creating a material made from 60% steel and 40% bronze.”

This 3D printed shoe collection is sure to impress…

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Ica & Kostika and 3D Printing Media Network

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Biolife4D Claims to have Fully 3D Printed a Mini Human Heart

Futurism reports on Chicago-based biotech firm Biolife4D, which “claims to have 3D bioprinted a miniaturized human heart – chambers, ventricles, and all.” The team at Biolife4D aims to eventually “print full-scale human hearts, which can be transplanted into human patients, like changing out a watch battery.”

Biolife4D used their own patented bioink, which the company described as “similar in properties to gelatin, designed from the ground up to replicate actual human biomaterials. The heart was printed the same way a consumer-grade 3D printer prints small objects: layer by layer. To help with structural integrity during the printing process, Biolife4D printed an additional support scaffold encasing the heart.”

Once Biolife4D finished printing their miniaturized heart, the team “transferred it to a bioreactor, mimicking the conditions of the human body, helping the cells fuse themselves into tissue.” Of course, others have claimed to be the first ones to create the first 3D printed human heart, but what sets Biolife4D’s heart from the others is “its inner workings: it sports four major internal chambers and other structures, like valves, that are usually found inside the human heart.”

Of course, “the mini heart is far from ready for transplant. And rather than ensuring survival of a human patient, the mini heart could alternately become a viable tool for cardiotoxicity testing — the study of how drug treatments and medications could damage heart muscles. (Which it was initially designed for.)”

Biolife4D aims “to scale up production to eventually bioprint a full-size human heart” in the very near future.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Biolife4D

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Relativity Expands 3D Printed Rocket Program in Mississippi

WLOX in Mississippi reports on Relativity’s commitment to its 3D printed rocket program, which will be hiring 190 more people in the near future.

Additionally, “the aerospace manufacturer has signed a 20-year lease at NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Mississippi.” Lead Data and Controls System Engineer for Relativity Jon Oliver returns to Mississippi.

As Oliver explains, “to be able to come back home to South Mississippi and be able to work on some revolutionary and game-changing ideas in the aerospace industry is pretty amazing. From a professional level, I get to work on some amazing technology and solve some extremely interesting problems. But from a personal level, we’re doing this in my hometown area, and so it’s really great to see such innovation occurring here locally.”

Relativity plans to “expand testing facilities, and in the next five years, build its 3D printing rocket factory.” As a spokesman for them explains: “we are looking for those engineers and technicians who are hard workers, think outside the box, and are looking to be in a new industry, expand our opportunities, and redesign the way we think about aerospace.”

Indeed, Relativity is committing itself to the area. Their growth here “brings a $59 million investment to Hancock County.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of WLOX

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3D Printed Hip Implants: Now Cloud-Based!

3D Printing Industry reports manufacturing service provider LOGEEKs, located in Russia, has just recently announced “its digital manufacturing arm, LOGEEKs DM, has launched a new cloud platform dedicated to analyzing the manufacturability of a 3D model for 3D printing, as well as CNC machining.”

LOGEEKs DM’s CEO Igor Krasovsky explains: “we launched the LOGEEKs DM online platform to solve several tasks. We have created a platform, which in most cases, allows without the participation of specialists to agree on expectations (time, quality, cost) and stretch through production processes ‘digital thread’: from the customer ‘s request to the moment of shipment of the finished part.”

Additionally, the “company’s medical subsidiary, LOGEEKs Medical Systems (MS) has…announced the completion of two surgery operations using its customized 3D printed implants.” These operations involved LOGEEKs’ 3D printed hip implants.

Indeed, since the company’s inception all the way back in 2004, LOGEEKs has “helped produce over 1,000 successful projects in the field of mechanical engineering and instrumentation, consumer goods, and medicine.”

Among other subsidiaries of the company is LOGEEKs Design, which specializes “in industrial design and engineering; PROTOTYPSTER, a 3D printing service for the maker community, and LOGEEKs Consult, a consulting service provider for manufacturing enterprises.”

LOGEEKs DM’s “new cloud platform will allow users to generate instant prices and select production times for its various production technologies, including DMLS and SLS 3D printing, 3 and 5 axis CNC processing, and polyurethane molding. The cloud platform uses an analysis algorithm to give users feedback on the viability of producing their part. They will receive recommendations and warnings regarding their 3D model according to technological limitations.”

LOGEEKs MS’s surgeries used 3D printed implants “in conjunction with impaction bone grafting, a surgical procedure for repairing the acetabular (the cup-shaped socket of the hip joint). Bone grafting replaces missing bone in order to repair bone fractures that are extremely complex, pose a significant health risk to the patient, or fail to heal properly.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry and LOGEEKs

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