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December 2017 in 3D Printing

One of the most interesting 3D printing stories this month was a follow-up to a story from a few years ago.

3Ders reports on an update to a story a few years in the making.

Coral reefs sustain 25% of the world’s marine life.  That is a staggering amount of biodiversity.  However, climate change threatens to deal a blow to that biodiversity.  “Since the 1980s, approximately half the Earth’s coral reefs have died, with that number steadily on the rise.  Two years ago, scientists observed the third-ever global bleaching of coral reefs, in what has been called the largest coral destruction in history.”

That’s where scientists at Monaco’s marine-protected Larvatto Bay comes in.  Back in 2015, they unveiled plans for six new 3D printed coral reefs “in an effort to restore the area’s biodiversity.”

Well, now those 3D printed coral reefs have been printed and installed along the ocean floor.  “The massive reef structures, which measure 1.2 X 2 meters each, weigh a hefty 2,500 kilograms, and required 13+ hours of 3D printing time.”  They “were manufactured by Dutch maritime company Boskalis and supported by Monaco’s Prince Albert II Foundation.  These impressive structures were constructed from Dolomite sand and volcanic ash.”

Divers from the Monaco Association for the Protection of Nature began the underwater installation by “using balloons to buoy the units in their steel transport cage.  Once the structures were towed by boat to their final locations [along the bay], divers deflated the balloons, lowering the units gently down to the seabed.  After being safely placed on the ocean floor, the protective transport cages were removed, signaling the beginning of an extensive monitoring period.”

Boskalis Environmental Engineer Astrid Kramer is clearly excited: “we are really creating new horizons here.  It is fantastic to work with such a multidisciplinary team with people from so many different disciplines, from industrial designers to local specialists.  The world around us is changing and I think this symbolizes how a modern project should be.  It won’t be just the reefs that gain from this valuable knowledge, it can be applied to other fields as well.  This initiative combines both environmental benefits and those of the business.”

“Boskalis intends to share this data with the scientific community, so we can increase our knowledge in this pioneering area.”

Elsewhere, hackers have discovered an innovative way to use 3D printing to fool Apple’s brand new facial recognition software.

3DPrint reports on cyber security firm Bkav, who has used 3D printed faces in order to hack Apple’s new facial recognition software on the iPhone X.  They were able to dismantle Apple’s claim of invulnerable security barely a week after the new phone was released.

Face ID – Apple’s new security measure, is “enabled by Apple’s TrueDepth camera, projecting and analyzing over 30,000 invisible dots to create a precise depth map of your face.  Face ID is different from other electronic devices’ image recognition techniques due to this dot projection, which creates a 3D image by directing beams of infrared light at a person’s face” in order to learn it.  Other faces are locked out of that particular phone.

“Apple claims there is a one in a million chance of another person being able to beat Face ID.”

They are wrong.

Laying aside the identical twins issue (which is already a proven hack), “a team of Bkav hackers and researchers say they have used a 3D printed mask, which only cost $150 to make, to fool the Face ID software.”

Bkav’s Vice President of Cyber Security, Ngo Tuan Anh, quite rightly explains: “Apple’s new Face ID is not an effective security measure.  The mask is crafted by combining 3D printing with makeup and 2D images, besides some special processing on the cheeks and around the face, where there are large skin areas, to fool AI of Face ID.”

“Bkav made a silicone nose and printed 3D images for the eyes to complete the 3D printed mask, whit it says could be replicated by knowledgeable hackers with access to 3D scanners.”

As Anh concludes: “Exploitation is difficult for normal users, but simple for professional ones.”

From hackers to self-balancing scooters, 3D printing continues to upend paradigms:

Stratasys recently released a statement concerning the development of a 3D printed self-balancing scooter.  This scooter was developed by a team at the University of Applied Sciences Ravensburg-Weingarten in Germany.

“The University of Applied Sciences Ravensburg-Weingarten is participating in a…project: ‘Digital Product Life Cycle.’”  The goal of this project “is to establish a fully integrated and automated digital development process for the production of customized products.”  In order to achieve this goal, the team “built the entire product development process for the scooter around additive manufacturing.  As a result, the team produced the first fully-functional prototype 85% faster compared to traditional manufacturing methods.”

As Dr. Markus Till, Head of Department Mechanical Engineering at University of Ravensburg-Weingarten explains: “we realized 3D printing offers the best possible manufacturing solution for an ideal executable product development method for a customized product.  We designed the entire product development process around Stratasys’ additive technologies, enabling us to quickly design and produce a fully-functional prototype of a geometry that was previously too complex to be created through any other traditional method – offering the first viable alternative for quick and cost-effective customized production.”

As for the specifics – the scooter’s “frame and platform parts were 3D printed in tough Nylon6 material on the large-scale Stratasys Fortus 900mc Production 3D Printer.”  This allowed for the scooter’s larger parts to be 3D printed all in one piece.  Next, “the platform was fitted with a 3D printed rubber-like cover for better grip, which was produced in Agilus30 material on the Stratasys Connex3 Color Multi-Material 3D Printer.”

Andy Middleton, President EMEA, Stratasys, adds: “the University of Applied Sciences Ravensburg-Weingarten is a prime example of how designers, engineers, and manufacturers today are involving additive manufacturing from the outset of product design to be able to exploit its benefits throughout the entire development cycle.  As such, we believe it’s crucial that the next generation of engineers are given the right education to prepare them for the requirements of engineering within industry.  As we see more educational institutions continue to adopt additive technologies, we expect to see more students learn the relevant skills and tools to be competitive for top engineering and manufacturing jobs.”

We end our exploration of the 3D printing world this month with the launch of a 3D printer from an established name in the global imaging industry.

TCT Magazine reports on yet another globally recognized brand jumping on the 3D printed bandwagon.  KODAK, the global imaging brand, has just announced the launch of the Portrait 3D Printer.  Concurrently, the company is also releasing a range of filaments.

The Portrait 3D Printer comes as a result of an agreement KODAK has made with technology solutions provider Smart International.  Before the 3D printer is launched, however, KODAK is launching the KODAK 3D Printing Filament Line.  This line is “designed to deliver industry-leading low moisture content, high melt flow index and precise diameter and roundness for high-quality prints.”

However, the main event will undoubtedly be KODAK’s Portrait 3D Printer.  The company plans to present its new additive manufacturing device at CES in January.  The Portrait features “a dual extruder [with] a build volume of 200 x 200 x 250 mm.”  Additionally, the 3D printer will boast “a sensor which tells the user when filament is running low, a color light signal to indicate the printer’s state, an air filtration system, auto-calibration, and a touch screen.”

CEO of Smart International Roberto Gawianski is thrilled: “we are excited to take the KODAK brand into 3D printing and pioneer a best in class series of desktop 3D printers and materials designed specifically for creative professionals.”

Indeed, the Portrait 3D Printer is aimed at the professional market.  KODAK hopes “its new 3D printing solution will fit well into environments such as architectural studios, creative workspaces, or classrooms.”  KODAK’s VP Director of Brand Licensing Joel Satin admits: “professional 3D printing is a fast-evolving growth category KODAK has had its eye on for a while.”

The KODAK Portrait 3D Printer “is available to pre-order now with a 35% discount on its standard retail price of $2,799 and will begin shipping in March 2018.”

3D printing has truly crept into every facet of industry.

Image Courtesy of 3Ders

Quotes Courtesy of 3Ders, 3DPrint, Bkav, Stratasys, KODAK, and TCT Magazine  

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Seven-Year-Old With 3D Printed Hand Throws First Pitch of World Series Game 4

Tech Crunch reports on the further adventures of 3D printed technology.

This time, seven-year-old Hailey Dawson, who sports a 3D printed hand, has recently thrown the first pitch for World Series Game 4.  This is her third major league first pitch.

Dawson’s 3D printed prosthetic was developed by a research team at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.  She “was born with a rare condition called Poland Syndrome, which left her missing three fingers on her right hand.”

As with many other kids with 3D printed prosthetics, Dawson and her family soon discovered that often traditionally manufactured prosthetics can be prohibitively expensive.  “Many insurance plans won’t cover the $25,000+ to supply them for children, deeming them ‘unnecessary.’  Children quickly outgrow the devices and the cost starts to add up.  It’s a hole in the healthcare system that has been tackled by a number of groups in the 3D printing industry, including not-for-profits like the Open Hand Project.”

As in many other situations, 3D printing a prosthetic limb “dramatically reduces the manufacturing cost and allows for much easier part swapping, should something become broken or its wearer just grows out of it.”

In the Dawsons’ case, Hailey’s mother Yong “reached out to their local University, UNLV, to ask if they’d be able to help create a custom prosthetic.”  As Chairman of UNLV’s Mechanical Engineering Department Brendan O’Toole explains, “additive manufacturing has made it possible to provide low-cost prosthetic devices for children like Hailey.  We can now make a few measurements of a child’s hand, process them through our custom design tool that generates 37 CAD models in a few minutes, and then have printed parts ready the next day.”  O’Toole and his team utilized a Stratasys 3D printer.

Stratasys’ Jesse Roitenberg put it best: “that’s the beauty of 3D printing.  It’s not just printing the next rocket or the dashboard of a Ford.  It’s being used to improve lives.”  As for Dawson’s first pitch at World Series Game 4, it went off without a hitch.  Her 3D printed arm that night was even custom fitted with Houston Astros colors.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Tech Crunch

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Boost Wi-Fi with 3D Printed Reflector

According to ZDNet, there is a new way to boost your Wi-Fi signal.

“Researchers have developed an algorithm which allows you to customize a [3D printed] Wi-Fi reflector to boost signals in the rooms you need it most.  The system, developed by researchers at Dartmouth College, University of Washington, Columbia University, and UC Irvine, offers a cheap way to boost Wi-Fi coverage in specific areas of the home.”

As Dartmouth Assistant Professor of Computer Science Xia Zhou explains: “with a simple investment of about $35 and specifying coverage requirements, a wireless reflector can be custom-built to outperform antennae that cost thousands of dollars.”

This system the researchers have developed gives users the ability “to design their own ‘soda can’ reflector that’s optimized for the layout of a house.  The design is 3D printed and then wrapped in foil…the researchers’ tests showed a reflector for a single access point can boost throughput by 22 percent to the desired rooms and reduce throughput by 36 percent to non-targeted rooms.”

“The algorithm they developed computes a reflector shape optimized for the targeted areas of an indoor setting.  They use 3D ray tracing to create a model of how radio signals interact with objects in a 3D environment.  The access points they conducted the tests with include a Netgear R7000, Linksys WRT54GL, and a TP-Link WR841N.  To measure the effectiveness of the reflectors, [the team of researchers] used a drone with built-in Wi-Fi radio to collect signal strengths at specific locations around the test environment.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of ZDNet

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Leapfrog: Bolt Pro 3D Printer

Leapfrog recently featured their professional grade 3D printer, the Bolt Pro, on their website.  As they boast, “the Bolt Pro is an industrial machine, not just an electronics device.”

Developed by Leapfrog for “long-term reliable 3D printing,” the Bolt Pro “is suited for any office or industrial environment.”  In fact, this professional grade 3D printer starts at $8,499.  Additionally, the Bolt Pro features an advanced FDM 3D print system and utilizes the slicer software Simplify3D.

As Leapfrog expands: “the Bolt Pro 3D Printer is equipped with unique direct drive Independent Dual Extruders.  This means both extruders can move independent from each other for clean dual prints.  The unique nozzles also give unique benefits like sync- or mirror-mode as well as swappable nozzles for a greater selection of filaments.”

In order for this 3D printer to be appropriate for workplace situations, Leapfrog outfitted it with a HEPA carbon filter: “this means that any negative fumes which might be produced while printing are reduced by 99.9%.  Working with multiple persons on one machine also is more controlled and safer by using different user logins with different privilege.  And the on-board storage can be integrated with One-Drive and Dropbox for a smooth workflow between different users or departments.

As can probably already be surmised, the Bolt Pro is able to print using materials such as the Leapfrog Maxx Essentials and Leapfrog Maxx Pro lines of 3D printing filament.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Leapfrog

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HP Announces Jet Fusion 3D 4210

3Ders reports on yet another expansion by software giant HP.  HP has just announced “its newest 3D printing solution: the Jet Fusion 3D 4210, a system upgrade aimed at industrial-scale 3D manufacturing, alongside an expanded materials portfolio.”

The Jet Fusion 3D 4210’s biggest selling point is its cost efficiency.  “By raising the industry’s ‘break-even point’ for large-scale 3D printing up to 110,000 parts, the Jet Fusion 3D 4210 significantly lowers overall operating costs while vastly increasing production volume.”

As General Manager of Multi Jet Fusion for HP’s 3D Printing business Ramon Pastor explains: “the new 3D 4210 Printing Solution enables our customers to mass-produce parts using HP’s Multi Jet Fusion Technology for 65% less than other processes, and fully benefit from the economies of scale.  HP’s Jet Fusion 3D systems have now reached a technological and economic inflection point that combines the speed, quality, and scalability needed to accelerate manufacturing’s digital industrial revolution.”

Beyond the announcement of their new 3D printer, HP also announced the expansion of its “material platform, featuring three new 3D printing materials.”  These materials include 3D High Reusability PA II, “aimed at producing low-cost, high-quality functional parts such as prosthetics, insoles, sports equipment, snap fits, and living hinges,” PA 12 (for glass parts), and Polypropylene, “a durable, inexpensive material offering enhanced flexibility and excellent chemical resistance.”

Preorders for HP’s Jet Fusion 3D 4210 3D Printer will be announced soon.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of HP and 3Ders

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3D Printed Coral Reefs Installed Off Monaco Coast

3Ders reports on an update to a story a few years in the making.

Coral reefs sustain 25% of the world’s marine life.  That is a staggering amount of biodiversity.  However, climate change threatens to deal a blow to that biodiversity.  “Since the 1980s, approximately half the Earth’s coral reefs have died, with that number steadily on the rise.  Two years ago, scientists observed the third-ever global bleaching of coral reefs, in what has been called the largest coral destruction in history.”

That’s where scientists at Monaco’s marine-protected Larvatto Bay comes in.  Back in 2015, they unveiled plans for six new 3D printed coral reefs “in an effort to restore the area’s biodiversity.”

Well, now those 3D printed coral reefs have been printed and installed along the ocean floor.  “The massive reef structures, which measure 1.2 X 2 meters each, weigh a hefty 2,500 kilograms, and required 13+ hours of 3D printing time.”  They “were manufactured by Dutch maritime company Boskalis and supported by Monaco’s Prince Albert II Foundation.  These impressive structures were constructed from Dolomite sand and volcanic ash.”

Divers from the Monaco Association for the Protection of Nature began the underwater installation by “using balloons to buoy the units in their steel transport cage.  Once the structures were towed by boat to their final locations [along the bay], divers deflated the balloons, lowering the units gently down to the seabed.  After being safely placed on the ocean floor, the protective transport cages were removed, signaling the beginning of an extensive monitoring period.”

Boskalis Environmental Engineer Astrid Kramer is clearly excited: “we are really creating new horizons here.  It is fantastic to work with such a multidisciplinary team with people from so many different disciplines, from industrial designers to local specialists.  The world around us is changing and I think this symbolizes how a modern project should be.  It won’t be just the reefs that gain from this valuable knowledge, it can be applied to other fields as well.  This initiative combines both environmental benefits and those of the business.”

“Boskalis intends to share this data with the scientific community, so we can increase our knowledge in this pioneering area.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3Ders

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KODAK Launches Portrait 3D Printer

TCT Magazine reports on yet another globally recognized brand jumping on the 3D printed bandwagon.  KODAK, the global imaging brand, has just announced the launch of the Portrait 3D Printer.  Concurrently, the company is also releasing a range of filaments.

The Portrait 3D Printer comes as a result of an agreement KODAK has made with technology solutions provider Smart International.  Before the 3D printer is launched, however, KODAK is launching the KODAK 3D Printing Filament Line.  This line is “designed to deliver industry-leading low moisture content, high melt flow index and precise diameter and roundness for high-quality prints.”

However, the main event will undoubtedly be KODAK’s Portrait 3D Printer.  The company plans to present its new additive manufacturing device at CES in January.  The Portrait features “a dual extruder [with] a build volume of 200 x 200 x 250 mm.”  Additionally, the 3D printer will boast “a sensor which tells the user when filament is running low, a color light signal to indicate the printer’s state, an air filtration system, auto-calibration, and a touch screen.”

CEO of Smart International Roberto Gawianski is thrilled: “we are excited to take the KODAK brand into 3D printing and pioneer a best in class series of desktop 3D printers and materials designed specifically for creative professionals.”

Indeed, the Portrait 3D Printer is aimed at the professional market.  KODAK hopes “its new 3D printing solution will fit well into environments such as architectural studios, creative workspaces, or classrooms.”  KODAK’s VP Director of Brand Licensing Joel Satin admits: “professional 3D printing is a fast-evolving growth category KODAK has had its eye on for a while.”

The KODAK Portrait 3D Printer “is available to pre-order now with a 35% discount on its standard retail price of $2,799 and will begin shipping in March 2018.”

Image, Video, and Quotes Courtesy of KODAK and TCT Magazine

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SPEE3D Launches Supersonic Deposition Metal 3D Printer

The Engineer reports on the launch of a revolutionary 3D printer.  SPEE3D, based in Australia, “has launched the world’s first metal 3D printer utilizing supersonic deposition technology to deliver manufacturing grade 3D printed parts at production speeds.”

Supersonic deposition technology, unlike 3D printing layer by layer, consists of a rocket nozzle accelerating “air up to three times the speed of sound to deliver manufacturing grade metal and high-density parts.”

“In doing so, the technology has shown it can print a flywheel in 11 minutes and 38 seconds compared to the 20 hours it would take with traditional manufacturing.  Similarly, results from SPEE3D have shown that a car part can be printed in 20 minutes for $30 instead of taking upwards of 100 hours for $3,000.”

As SPEE3D Co-Founder and CEO Byron Kennedy explains, this technology has been utilized “in the repair world, where metals such as titanium, Inconel, steel, stainless steel, copper, and tantalum” are taken advantage of.  “Copper is…a material very easy for the technology to print at very high speeds, which opens up thermal and electrical conductivity opportunities.”

“Due to the low cost and high-speed of 3D printing, manufacturers will soon realize they can print parts faster and cheaper than they currently CNC or cast…the software is continuing to evolve and we are adding new features all the time as we print more and more parts.  Six months ago, there were parts we couldn’t imagine we could print that we can easily do today.”

With their brand-new printer installed at Charles Darwin University in Australia, SPEE3D plans “to install printers for demonstrations in Frankfurt, Michigan, and Sydney.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of The Engineer

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Foldable 3D Printed Implants

The Engineer reports on new 3D printed implants developed by a team of researchers at TU Delft in the Netherlands.  The team’s findings have been published in the journal Materials Horizons. 

What makes these 3D printed implants unique is their cost-effectiveness and their ability to “self-fold according to a pre-planned sequence.”  This ability was inspired by origami.  Lead Researcher Professor Amir Zadpoor explains: “if the goal is to create complex shapes, and it is, some parts should fold sooner than others.  Therefore, we needed to program time delays into the material.  This is called sequential shape-shifting.”

The team accomplished this “by simultaneously printing and stretching the material in certain places.”  As PhD Researcher Teunis van Manen adds: “the stretching is stored inside the material as a memory.  When heated up, the memory is released, and the material wants to go back to its original state.”

“By alternating the thickness and the alignment of the filaments in the material, the researchers succeeded in creating 2D structures that shape-shift sequentially.”  The team used an Ultimaker 3D printer and PLA filament.  This only cost about $20 per kilo.

This origami-inspired process will pave the way for the creation of better bone implants – creating prosthetics with porous interiors.  “This will allow a patient’s own stem cells to move into the structure of the implant and attach themselves to the interior surface area, instead of just coating the exterior.  The end result will be a stronger, more durable implant.  Secondly, with this technique, nanopatterns that guide cell growth can be crafted on the surface of the implant.”

Image, Quotes, and Video Courtesy of The Engineer and TU Delft

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Hacking the iPhone X with 3D Printed Faces

3DPrint reports on cyber security firm Bkav, who has used 3D printed faces in order to hack Apple’s new facial recognition software on the iPhone X.  They were able to dismantle Apple’s claim of invulnerable security barely a week after the new phone was released.

Face ID – Apple’s new security measure, is “enabled by Apple’s TrueDepth camera, projecting and analyzing over 30,000 invisible dots to create a precise depth map of your face.  Face ID is different from other electronic devices’ image recognition techniques due to this dot projection, which creates a 3D image by directing beams of infrared light at a person’s face” in order to learn it.  Other faces are locked out of that particular phone.

“Apple claims there is a one in a million chance of another person being able to beat Face ID.”

They are wrong.

Laying aside the identical twins issue (which is already a proven hack), “a team of Bkav hackers and researchers say they have used a 3D printed mask, which only cost $150 to make, to fool the Face ID software.”

Bkav’s Vice President of Cyber Security, Ngo Tuan Anh, quite rightly explains: “Apple’s new Face ID is not an effective security measure.  The mask is crafted by combining 3D printing with makeup and 2D images, besides some special processing on the cheeks and around the face, where there are large skin areas, to fool AI of Face ID.”

“Bkav made a silicone nose and printed 3D images for the eyes to complete the 3D printed mask, whit it says could be replicated by knowledgeable hackers with access to 3D scanners.”

As Anh concludes: “Exploitation is difficult for normal users, but simple for professional ones.”

Video, Image, and Quotes Courtesy of Bkav and 3DPrint

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Doubling the Strength of 3D Printed Stainless Steel

Science Magazine reports on a recent innovation in the world of stainless steel.

For those unaware, stainless steel was invented about 150 years ago.  “It’s made by melting conventional steel – itself a combination of iron and carbon (and sometimes other metals like nickel) – and adding in chromium and molybdenum, which prevent rust and corrosion.  A complex series of cooling, reheating, and rolling steps gives the material a microscopic structure with tightly packed alloy grains and thin boundaries between the grains that create a cell-like structure.  When the metal is bent or stressed, planes of atoms in the grains slide past one another, sometimes causing crystalline defects to connect with each other – producing fractures.  But strong boundaries can halt these defects, making the material tough, yet still flexible enough to be formed into a desired shape.”

Now, 3D printers are able to print using stainless steel – which is a big deal.  Up until this point, 3D printers have worked “best with plastic and porous steel – materials too weak for hard-core applications.”

“[Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, however, have recently] come up with a way to 3D print tough and flexible stainless steel, an advance that could lead to faster and cheaper ways to make everything from rocket engines to parts for nuclear reactors and oil rigs.”

These researchers have designed “a computer-controlled process to not only create dense stainless steel layers, but to more tightly control the structure of their material from the nano to micron scale.  That allows the printer to build in tiny cell wall-like structures on each scale that prevent fractures and other common problems.”

What is perhaps most impressive about this whole process is the fact the researchers used a commercially available 3D printer and laser to print with this stainless steel.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Science Magazine

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Stratasys: 3D Printed Self-Balancing Scooter

Stratasys recently released a statement concerning the development of a 3D printed self-balancing scooter.  This scooter was developed by a team at the University of Applied Sciences Ravensburg-Weingarten in Germany.

“The University of Applied Sciences Ravensburg-Weingarten is participating in a…project: ‘Digital Product Life Cycle.’”  The goal of this project “is to establish a fully integrated and automated digital development process for the production of customized products.”  In order to achieve this goal, the team “built the entire product development process for the scooter around additive manufacturing.  As a result, the team produced the first fully-functional prototype 85% faster compared to traditional manufacturing methods.”

As Dr. Markus Till, Head of Department Mechanical Engineering at University of Ravensburg-Weingarten explains: “we realized 3D printing offers the best possible manufacturing solution for an ideal executable product development method for a customized product.  We designed the entire product development process around Stratasys’ additive technologies, enabling us to quickly design and produce a fully-functional prototype of a geometry that was previously too complex to be created through any other traditional method – offering the first viable alternative for quick and cost-effective customized production.”

As for the specifics – the scooter’s “frame and platform parts were 3D printed in tough Nylon6 material on the large-scale Stratasys Fortus 900mc Production 3D Printer.”  This allowed for the scooter’s larger parts to be 3D printed all in one piece.  Next, “the platform was fitted with a 3D printed rubber-like cover for better grip, which was produced in Agilus30 material on the Stratasys Connex3 Color Multi-Material 3D Printer.”

Andy Middleton, President EMEA, Stratasys, adds: “the University of Applied Sciences Ravensburg-Weingarten is a prime example of how designers, engineers, and manufacturers today are involving additive manufacturing from the outset of product design to be able to exploit its benefits throughout the entire development cycle.  As such, we believe it’s crucial that the next generation of engineers are given the right education to prepare them for the requirements of engineering within industry.  As we see more educational institutions continue to adopt additive technologies, we expect to see more students learn the relevant skills and tools to be competitive for top engineering and manufacturing jobs.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Stratasys

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