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3D Printed Porsche Restoration Component Wins Award

3D Printing Industry reports “Weerg, an online 3D printing and CNC service provider, has announced Porsche technician Benjamin Nenert as the winner of its 2019 3D Printing Project Award.”

Apparently, “Nenert’s project of a vehicle component for the Porsche 928 was awarded the top prize by Weerg for the second edition of its 3D printing competition, which opened in April and consists of a $558 Weerg coupon.”

This award “is an online social contest, which invites contestants, ranging from designers, developers, and engineers, to create an innovative 3D object, with the winning design then 3D printed by Weerg using its installation of HP Multi Jet Fusion 4210 3D printers.”

As Weerg’s Founder Matteo Rigamonti explains: “Among the many nominations received on our Facebook and Instagram pages, we have chosen to award [Benjamin Nenert’s] project because it represents an example of simple creativity, as well as an intelligent integration of 3D and CNC technologies.”

Nenert is a Porsche technician who lives in France.  “He specializes in diagnostics and repairs of Porsche vehicles, and also works a second job in his spare time under his own business, ‘Ben Auto Design.’  For his company, he offers repairs and refurbishment of vintage Porsches by modernizing the components with design manufacturing.”

As for Nenert’s award-winning project, it is “the restoration of an engine component within a 1983 Porsche 928 engine. The Porsche technician is using the 3D printing offered by Weerg to produce and restore the intake plenum, which he claims is the first time a piece like the vintage engine component [has been 3D printed.] Although the restoration of the Porsche 928’s 4.7-liter V8 engine is an ambitious and time-consuming project, with many pieces to be designed and produced, Nenert is sure the HP MJF 4210 3D printers at Weerg will be able to provide the required properties to create a functioning intake plenum.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry

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Veterans Affairs and 3D Printing

Military.com reports on Veterans Affairs, the governmental agency tasked with aiding veterans.  Apparently the VA wishes to expand its presence in the 3D printing arena.

As Dr. Beth Ripley, a radiologist at VA Medical Center Puget Sound and Chair of the Veterans Health Administration’s 3D Printing Advisory Committee explains: “3D printing is a total game changer.  Often technology pushes us further away from our patients…this technology is allowing our VA staff to really come close to the patient.”

Indeed, the VA “has launched an aggressive campaign to put 3D printers in many of its medical centers.  The initiative aims to improve patient care by aiding surgical planning, crafting assistive medical devices and prosthetic limbs, and eventually creating bones and organs for transplant.”

“The department has more than 100 printers at 23 medical centers, up from just three in 2017.”  It has plans for even more. “VA Ann Arbor Healthcare Systems in Michigan currently is working on creating an artificial lung, which could be utilized while a patient waits for a lung transplant or needs help breathing during recovery from a respiratory illness.  The 3D artificial lungs would replicate the structure and size of the blood vessels and would be constructed of substances that would be more compatible with the human body, reducing immune response.”

“The VA’s 3D Printing Center of Excellence falls under what VA calls its VHA Innovation Ecosystem, which encompasses programs aiming to identify best practices at VA medical centers and push them out across the VA’s health system.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Military.com

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Relativity Space Aims for 3D Printed Rocket Satellite Thai Launch

Space.com reports on a recent announcement by 3D printed rocket company Relativity.  Apparently Relativity is partnering with Thai satellite “company mu Space, to launch a satellite into low Earth orbit in about three years.”

“The mu Space satellite would launch in 2022 on what Relativity officials call the first 3D printed rocket ever built.  According to them, this vehicle – Terran 1 – is designed to carry up to 2,756 lbs. (1,250 kilograms) into low Earth orbit, with a cost of $10 million per launch.”

Relativity’s metal 3D printer, which the company has dubbed their ‘Stargate machine,’ is apparently “the largest metal 3D printer in the world, with the capacity to transform raw materials into a rocket, like Terran 1, in less than 60 days.”

As Relativity’s website explains: “Stargate is constantly getting smarter and faster by using sensors and reward function-based learning.  We are creating an entirely new type of evolvable production line.  Relativity aims to disrupt decades of global aerospace manufacturing.”

For now, Relativity “strives to deploy and resupply satellite constellations into orbit around Earth.  [However, the company is making] bold plans for its future.  By scaling rockets quickly, Relativity hopes to build the future of humanity in space: the future of humanity is interplanetary.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Space.com

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Adidas Adds Y-3 Runner 4D II to 3D Printed Shoe Line

3D Printing Media Network reports upon a fascinating new announcement made by the shoe manufacturing giant Adidas.  Apparently, the company is adding a brand new shoe to their 3D printed shoe line.

This line of shoes sport 3D printed midsoles.  The “Y-3 Runner 4D was designed in collaboration with influential Japanese designer Yohji Yamamoto.  Yohji’s experimental sneakers have become a go-to for haute couture hobbyists and his unique approach to footwear design has shaped the modern sneaker landscape.  In line with his constant need for innovation, the latest model in the Y-3 series presents for the first time a new bone-white midsole (unlike all previous greenish versions), which is crafted with the latest evolution of Adidas 4D technology, provided by Carbon.”

Carbon, which is based in Redwood City, California, uses their proprietary Digital Light Synthesis 3D printing technology.  “Inspired by the ALPHAEDGE 4D midsole, the Y-3 Runner 4D evolves the breakthrough properties of Adidas 4D and features a wider footbed and a thicker, higher midsole for greater multi-directional stability; higher energy return in specific areas for more powerful bursts of movement.  In addition, a new Continental rubber outsole provides improved grip.”

Indeed, Adidas hopes “this evolution is set to cement the futuristic Y-3 Runner 4D II as the vanguard of contemporary sneaker design.  In a clever design feat, both layers are connected by a lightweight, ultra-strength cording made of high tensile. A synthesis of form and function, this distinct cording defines the new aesthetic language of the Y-3 Runner 4D II and simultaneously provides the shoe’s lacing system. This yields a confident new expression of the Adidas 4D vision.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Adidas and 3D Printing Media Network

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A 3D printed sole for an Adidas AG Futurecraft 4D trainer is produced by a 3D printing machine, manufactured by Carbon3D Inc., during the company's annual results announcement in Herzogenaurach, Germany, on Wednesday, March 14, 2018. Revenue at the German company jumped 12 percent in the fourth quarter, led by China and North America. Photographer: Krisztian Bocsi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Carbon Raises Up To $300M

Tech Crunch reports on Carbon, which “has authorized the sale of $300 million in Series E shares…if Carbon raises the full amount, it could reach a valuation of $2.5 billion.”

Carbon, which is based in Redwood City, California, became famous following the release of “its proprietary Digital Light Synthesis 3D printing technology.”  Indeed, Carbon has used this technology in “manufacturing, building high-tech sports equipment, a line of custom sneakers for Adidas, and more.”

Already, Carbon “was valued at $1.7 billion by venture capitalists with a $200 million Series D in 2018…to date, it’s raised a total of $422 million from investors like Sequoia, GV, Fidelity, General Electric, Hydra Ventures, and Adidas Ventures, not including the incoming round of capital.”

Carbon’s aim is “to help designers and manufacturers be more efficient, cut costs, and waste less energy and materials.”

As Carbon’s Co-Founder and Chief Executive Office Joseph DeSimone explains: “we are at the forefront of digital manufacturing, creating a new standard for the industry.  In order to continue pushing the boundaries of what our technology can do and to execute our global strategy, we need to have the best team at the top.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Tech Crunch

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Researchers Develop ‘Proof of Concept’ 3D Printed Heart

Live Science reports on the development of a ‘proof of concept’ 3D printed heart created by a team of researchers at Tel Aviv University in Israel.  The researchers published their findings recently in the scientific journal Advanced Science.

This heart, “which has four chambers and blood vessels” beats – ‘sort of.’  The heart was 3D printed from human tissue.  “Though the heart is much smaller than a human’s (it’s only the size of a rabbit’s), and there’s still a long way to go until it functions like a normal heart, the proof of concept experiment could eventually lead to personalized organs or tissues, which could be used in the human body.”

The team began 3D printing the heart “by taking a small sample of fatty tissue from a patient.  In the lab, they separated this tissue into its component cells and the structure on which the cells sit, called the extracellular matrix.  Using genetic engineering, the scientists then tweaked the various components, reprogramming some of the cells to become cardiac muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, and some to become cells generating blood vessels.”

These cells were then loaded into a 3D printer as bioinks.  The printer “had been programmed to print a heart based on CT scans taken from the patient and an artist’s depiction of a heart.  The printer took between 3 and 4 hours to print the small heart with basic blood vessels.”

The team hopes one day “a personalized 3D printed heart might ease the shortage of transplant organs available to patients and could also circumvent some of the risks associated with transplanting another person’s organ – namely, that the body’s immune system can reject these foreign tissues.”

The next step is “to print a full-size, fully functioning heart.”  In order to do this, “the scientists would need to print a higher resolution organ – one with much more vasculature capable of carrying oxygen and nutrients through it.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Live Science

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May: 3D Printing

We begin our monthly tour around the world of 3D printing by turning tragedy into triumph.

Dezeen reports on an intriguing new proposal concerning the rebuilding of Notre Dame Cathedral.  Following the fire it barely survived last month, $1.12 billion has been pledged to rebuild the world landmark.

For its part, Dutch company Concr3de has proposed an innovative and sensitive method for using that money: 3D printing.  Already, Concr3de has 3D printed a replacement gargoyle.  “Concr3de, which was founded by architects Eric Geboers and Matteo Baldassari in 2016, used 3D scans to reproduce Le Stryge, a demon statue atop the roof of the gothic cathedral, which collapsed in the fire.”  The team used an Armadillo White, a small 30 x 30 x 30 cm printer.

As Geboers explains: “we saw the spire collapse and thought we could propose a way to combine the old materials with new technology to help speed up the reconstruction and make a cathedral that is not simply a copy of the original, but rather a cathedral that would show its layered history proudly.”

Indeed, Geboers “believes using the materials left behind after the fire would address some philosophical problems posed by rebuilding Notre Dame to the original design while using new materials.”

“The Lutetian Limestone originally used to build Notre Dame, along with much of Paris, was taken from mines, which have since been buried under the expanding city. Large oak beams, which made up the now-destroyed timber roof of the cathedral were made from trees felled in the 13th century.”

If the project were to use “Concr3de’s proposal, this would allow the original material of the damaged building to be used in its reconstruction.  Even the limestone damaged by the high temperatures of the blaze could be used in the process.”

The team’s White Armadillo 3D printer is “a custom inkjet 3D printer fine-tuned to work with stone and stone-like materials.  It prints with 0.1-millimeter precision…any geometry is possible without the need for supports.  It also allows for significant material customization.”

“3D printing the more intricate pieces [of the restoration project] would address France’s labor shortage, suggested Concr3de, while still employing existing skilled stonemasons to fix the printed pieces into place.”

From the still beating heart of Paris to an actual beating heart – Live Science reports on the development of a ‘proof of concept’ 3D printed heart created by a team of researchers at Tel Aviv University in Israel.  The researchers published their findings recently in the scientific journal Advanced Science.

This heart, “which has four chambers and blood vessels” beats – ‘sort of.’  The heart was 3D printed from human tissue.  “Though the heart is much smaller than a human’s (it’s only the size of a rabbit’s), and there’s still a long way to go until it functions like a normal heart, the proof of concept experiment could eventually lead to personalized organs or tissues, which could be used in the human body.”

The team began 3D printing the heart “by taking a small sample of fatty tissue from a patient.  In the lab, they separated this tissue into its component cells and the structure on which the cells sit, called the extracellular matrix.  Using genetic engineering, the scientists then tweaked the various components, reprogramming some of the cells to become cardiac muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, and some to become cells generating blood vessels.”

These cells were then loaded into a 3D printer as bioinks.  The printer “had been programmed to print a heart based on CT scans taken from the patient and an artist’s depiction of a heart.  The printer took between 3 and 4 hours to print the small heart with basic blood vessels.”

The team hopes one day “a personalized 3D printed heart might ease the shortage of transplant organs available to patients and could also circumvent some of the risks associated with transplanting another person’s organ – namely, that the body’s immune system can reject these foreign tissues.”

The next step is “to print a full-size, fully functioning heart.”  In order to do this, “the scientists would need to print a higher resolution organ – one with much more vasculature capable of carrying oxygen and nutrients through it.”

Elsewhere in the healthcare industry, Military.com reports on Veterans Affairs, the governmental agency tasked with aiding veterans.  Apparently the VA wishes to expand its presence in the 3D printing arena.

As Dr. Beth Ripley, a radiologist at VA Medical Center Puget Sound and Chair of the Veterans Health Administration’s 3D Printing Advisory Committee explains: “3D printing is a total game changer.  Often technology pushes us further away from our patients…this technology is allowing our VA staff to really come close to the patient.”

Indeed, the VA “has launched an aggressive campaign to put 3D printers in many of its medical centers.  The initiative aims to improve patient care by aiding surgical planning, crafting assistive medical devices and prosthetic limbs, and eventually creating bones and organs for transplant.”

“The department has more than 100 printers at 23 medical centers, up from just three in 2017.”  It has plans for even more. “VA Ann Arbor Healthcare Systems in Michigan currently is working on creating an artificial lung, which could be utilized while a patient waits for a lung transplant or needs help breathing during recovery from a respiratory illness.  The 3D artificial lungs would replicate the structure and size of the blood vessels and would be constructed of substances that would be more compatible with the human body, reducing immune response.”

“The VA’s 3D Printing Center of Excellence falls under what VA calls its VHA Innovation Ecosystem, which encompasses programs aiming to identify best practices at VA medical centers and push them out across the VA’s health system.

Finally, Tech Crunch reports on Carbon, which “has authorized the sale of $300 million in Series E shares…if Carbon raises the full amount, it could reach a valuation of $2.5 billion.”

Carbon, which is based in Redwood City, California, became famous following the release of “its proprietary Digital Light Synthesis 3D printing technology.”  Indeed, Carbon has used this technology in “manufacturing, building high-tech sports equipment, a line of custom sneakers for Adidas, and more.”

Already, Carbon “was valued at $1.7 billion by venture capitalists with a $200 million Series D in 2018…to date, it’s raised a total of $422 million from investors like Sequoia, GV, Fidelity, General Electric, Hydra Ventures, and Adidas Ventures, not including the incoming round of capital.”

Carbon’s aim is “to help designers and manufacturers be more efficient, cut costs, and waste less energy and materials.”

As Carbon’s Co-Founder and Chief Executive Office Joseph DeSimone explains: “we are at the forefront of digital manufacturing, creating a new standard for the industry.  In order to continue pushing the boundaries of what our technology can do and to execute our global strategy, we need to have the best team at the top.”

Image Courtesy of Dezeen

Quotes Courtesy of Dezeen, Live Science, Military.com, and Tech Crunch

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3D Printing Soluble Filaments

According to Hackaday, when it comes to complicated 3D printed designs, they “often require the use of an automatically generated support structure around them for stability.”  The only issue here comes after the print itself, when makers are forced to endure “the painstaking process of removing all the support material without damaging the object itself.”

However, there has been a solution: “if you’ve got a suitably high-end 3D printer…[you can print your object’s supports] in a water soluble filament; just toss the print into a bath and wait for the support to dissolve away.”

“But what if you’re trying to print [an object] which is complex but also needs to be soluble?”  This is what engineer Jacob Blitzer has recently been experimenting with.  “The trick is finding two filaments, which can be printed at the same time but are dissolved with two different solutions.  His experimentation has proved it’s possible to do with consumer-level hardware, but it isn’t easy and it’s definitely not cheap.”

As for applications for this sort of object, Blitzer initially “wanted to be able to print hollow molds in complex geometric shapes, which would ultimately be filled with concrete.”  For these molds, Blitzer when with a High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS) filament.  “Finding a water-soluble filament for the supports, which could be printed at similar temperatures to the HIPS took months of research, but eventually he found one called HyroFill to fit the bill. Unfortunately, it costs…$175 per kilogram.”

To print these objects, Blitzer used a FORMBOT T-Rex, which “uses the old-school method of having two individual hot ends and extruders.”  The results, for Blitzer, have been mixed: “he’s produced some undeniably stunning pieces, but the failure rate has been very high.  Still, it’s fascinating research appearing to be the first of its kind.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Jacob Blitzer and Hackaday

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HP Announces New Digital Textile Printers Using Additive Manufacturing

3D Printing Industry was on hand at ISA Sign Expo 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada recently when HP announced a new line of digital textile printers.  Apparently, these printers utilize the wonders of manufacturing.

HP launched this “portfolio of digital textile printers for fast and precise color-matching, which show how additive manufacturing is increasingly used for end-use production.”

“This new range of large-format 2D printers, named the HP Stitch S series, incorporates 3D printed parts. Using additive manufacturing has saved the company an estimated $145,000 in tooling, design prototype modifications, and final parts production. The three new printers in the textile range include the HP Stitch S300, the HP Stitch S500, and the HP Stitch S1000.”

“HP Multi Jet fusion technology uses Nylon 12 (PA 12), fusing and detailing agents, to create high precision 3D printed parts with quality surface finishes. This process was utilized for several end-use and prototyped parts for the HP Stitch S Series printers.”

Indeed, one of these “3D printed parts includes a sensor pixar.  This is located on the flat platform of the printer (platen) and moves the media, detecting the progress of each print job.  HP reported savings of approximately $15,000 in tooling with MJF as it eliminated the need for molds.”

HP also claims “as a result of additive manufacturing, the cost of other parts has been reduced to 93%, while accelerating development cycles and iterations of design, reducing the time from weeks to days.  Such 3D printed components are lighter and more space efficient, which has also decreased material consumption in the overall production of the HP Stitch S printers.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry

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3D Printing with Biological Matter

According to The Daily Californian, “only 10 percent of the world’s needed organ transplantation is currently being met.”  Thankfully, researchers at UC Berkeley have just developed a 3D printing process, which could help fill this enormous need.

The researchers “have invented a 3D printing process, which can print biological matter and has the potential to make bioprinting tissue engineering more efficient.”  They published their findings in the scientific journal American Society of Mechanical Engineers Digital Collection.

The scientists utilized “multilayer cryolithography, which allowed them to simultaneously print parallel 2D layers and freeze those layers together to form a 3D structure.”  As Campus Researcher Zichen Xiao, “who worked on this project for his Master’s Degree Capstone Thesis,” explains: “it’s like making a hamburger in a very cool – cryogenic – solution.  You already print multiple layers, and you basically pick up one layer and stack the on top of each other.  You put the bottom bread there first and put whatever layer you want on top of it.  By the process of freezing, it keeps its rigid structure, and the cells are still alive.”

Xiao elaborates: “this process overcomes two major obstacles present in the field of bioprinting.  The first is that material made for bioprinting is usually soft, and thus cannot sustain its own weight.  The second significant challenge is met due to 3D printing taking a long time to execute – by the time a section is printed, the older cells on the bottom may have died.”

“The final iteration of the experiment was carried out using two 3D printers, one robotic arm, and other fixtures to ensure the layers were printed onto the structure quickly and the layers were frozen to bond them together.”

In the future, Xiao says, “this process can be used for tissue engineering or bioprinting…another application could be in the food industry…creating food people with digestion and chewing issues can eat.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of The Daily Californian

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Rebuilding Notre Dame with 3D Printing

Dezeen reports on an intriguing new proposal concerning the rebuilding of Notre Dame Cathedral.  Following the fire it barely survived last month, $1.12 billion has been pledged to rebuild the world landmark.

For its part, Dutch company Concr3de has proposed an innovative and sensitive method for using that money: 3D printing.  Already, Concr3de has 3D printed a replacement gargoyle.  “Concr3de, which was founded by architects Eric Geboers and Matteo Baldassari in 2016, used 3D scans to reproduce Le Stryge, a demon statue atop the roof of the gothic cathedral, which collapsed in the fire.”  The team used an Armadillo White, a small 30 x 30 x 30 cm printer.

As Geboers explains: “we saw the spire collapse and thought we could propose a way to combine the old materials with new technology to help speed up the reconstruction and make a cathedral that is not simply a copy of the original, but rather a cathedral that would show its layered history proudly.”

Indeed, Geboers “believes using the materials left behind after the fire would address some philosophical problems posed by rebuilding Notre Dame to the original design while using new materials.”

“The Lutetian Limestone originally used to build Notre Dame, along with much of Paris, was taken from mines, which have since been buried under the expanding city. Large oak beams, which made up the now-destroyed timber roof of the cathedral were made from trees felled in the 13th century.”

If the project were to use “Concr3de’s proposal, this would allow the original material of the damaged building to be used in its reconstruction.  Even the limestone damaged by the high temperatures of the blaze could be used in the process.”

The team’s White Armadillo 3D printer is “a custom inkjet 3D printer fine tuned to work with stone and stone-like materials.  It prints with 0.1-millimeter precision…any geometry is possible without the need for supports.  It also allows for significant material customization.”

“3D printing the more intricate pieces [of the restoration project] would address France’s labor shortage, suggested Concr3de, while still employing existing skilled stonemasons to fix the printed pieces into place.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Dezeen

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3D Printed Fingerprint Tricks Samsung Galaxy S10+

Mashable reports on Imgur user darkshark, who apparently managed to fool Samsung’s ultrasonic in-display fingerprint scanner on their Samsung Galaxy S10+ smartphone using a 3D printed fingerprint.

“If you have the phone owner’s fingerprint and access to fairly inexpensive 3D printing equipment, the entire process takes minutes and the resulting fingerprint copy will unlock the phone quite reliably.”

Darkshark “took a photograph of his fingerprint from the side of a wine glass with his smartphone.  He then created a 3D model of the fingerprint with 3DS Max software, and printed it on a piece of resin with the AnyCubic Photon LCD printer.”

The result was “a square piece of resin containing a 3D model of the fingerprint.”  As darkshark explains, “put this on the Galaxy S10+ and it will unlock it, in some cases just as well as the actual finger.”

Darkshark elaborates: “I can do this entire process in less than 3 minutes and remotely start the 3D print so it’s done by the time I get to it.  Most banking apps only require fingerprint authentication so I could have all of your info and spend your money in less than 15 minutes if your phone is secured by fingerprint alone.”

This goes against Samsung’s own marketing material, which claims their phones are secure.  “Hopefully this will be addressed in future iterations of these scanners or through software updates; for now, if your phone contains sensitive data, you should probably use a password instead.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of darkshark and Mashable

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