2016-12-19_09h47_43

Ringing in Another 3D Printed New Year

As with every other industry at this time of year, December marked a busy time for the additive manufacturing world.  Innovation stops for no holiday – and this season was no different.

We begin our monthly update in China.

TCT Magazine reports on yet another astounding medical breakthrough fueled by the wonder of 3D printing.

“A group of Chinese medical researchers have used 3D printing to create natural blood vessels.  Scientists at Sichuan Revotek developed the world’s first bio-printer in 2015 and have finally begun to produce fully functional blood vessels.  The process uses bio ink made up of living stem cells from rhesus monkeys, before the printer fuses layers of new cells to the old ones.”  Eventually, the new and old cells will start growing as one.

Kang Yujian, Chief Scientist at Sichuan Revotek, explains: “in five days, the new layer of endodermis will be formed.  Meanwhile, the smooth muscle cells will grow as well.  Within 28 days all these cells will go through tissue differentiation.  That means the tissue we implanted will have mingled with the original ones and grow into a regular vessel.  This is unprecedented.”

Following the development of this astounding bio-printer, the scientists began experimenting on 30 rhesus monkeys.  “After months of observation, scientists discovered the 3D printed vessels had completely blended.”  More importantly, all the monkeys remained in good condition as well.

Sichuan Revotek’s new bio-printer is so efficient “ten-centimeter blood vessels can be printed in just two minutes, thanks to its two nozzles.  At the heart of the technology is a stem cell culture system.  This consists of seed cells and bio-links filled with growth factors and nutrients.  When combined with other materials, the 3D bioprinter creates layered cell structures, [which] can be cultivated to form tissues with other physiological functions.”

Dai Kerong, an Academic at the Chinese Academy of Engineering, is astounded at this marvel: “printing 3D blood vessels is quite remarkable.  If we can apply this technology to blood vessels then we can also use it on livers, kidneys, and other organs.  That is how groundbreaking this technology is.”

This technology was hard at work elsewhere in the medical industry as well.  3D Printing Progress reports on yet another fascinating biomedical breakthrough facilitated by 3D printing.

Researchers from the Georgia Tech Manufacturing Institute and the Piedmont Heart Institute have collaborated to create a tool to aid cardiologists plan surgeries with far more precision for patients with heart valve disease.

“Using highly detailed imaging from CT scans, mechanical engineers are using 3D printers to make an exact model of an individual patient’s heart valve.  These one-of-a-kind models not only represent the size and proportion of the heart valve but can also mimic its physiological qualities – such as how it feels and responds to pressure.”

Heart valve disease, or more accurately aortic stenosis, is a condition where “the valves in the left side of the heart narrow, restricting blood flow and potentially leading to heart failure…the 3D printed heart valve models are particularly useful in planning a minimally invasive procedure called transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), during which heart doctors use a catheter to deliver a prosthetic heart valve to replace the patient’s impaired valve.”

As Chuck Zhang, a professor in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering explains: “the prosthetic valves are readily available in a range of types and sizes from multiple manufacturers; however, one of the most important factors for a positive outcome is matching up the patient’s natural heart valve with a prosthetic of the right type and size.  That’s where the 3D model comes into play.  The issue is, everybody is different.  [For example,] a male will be different than a female.  It’s a big challenge for the doctors to select the right type of…prosthesis for a specific patient.”

Zhen Qian, chief of Cardiovascular Imaging Research at the Piedmont Heart Institute adds: “the 3D printed models hold great promise for use in preparing for heart procedures.  The results are quite encouraging.  Our printed model is able to tell you before the procedure how much paravalvular leakage there will be and where it is, a good indicator for short and long-term mortality.”

These models are printed using a multimaterial 3D printer.  Additionally, “Zhang has been experimenting with embedding sensors on the models as well, using a machine that can print nanomaterial-enabled circuitry on the wall of the valve.  The sensors could potentially be used to monitor how much a prosthetic valve strains or deforms the model.  With this sensing capability, the printed heart valve also can be used as a phantom to monitor pre-surgery practice.”

“So far, the researchers have printed almost two dozen heart valve models based on actual patient imaging.”  As Zhang predicts: “there is big potential for these models.  We’re thinking in the future, this may be a standard tool for pre-surgery planning and for training new surgeons.”

Beyond the field of healthcare, 3D printing software also saw improvement.  3D Print reports on yet another software launch from 3D printing giant 3D Systems.  3D Sprint 2.0 is the latest iteration of software for several of the company’s plastics 3D printers.

Specifically, 3D Sprint 2.0 will work with ProJet 1200 and ProJet MJP 2500 series printers “and will begin shipping with these immediately.  3D Systems will announce at a later date when [this updated software] will support their other plastics 3D printers.”

3D Sprint 2.0 “reduces the need for users to divide projects between multiple software programs, thus streamlining the 3D printing workflows into a simplified process and saving users time and money.”

Brand new “software features [allow users to perform] advanced operations like part splitting, offsetting, and part quality checks.  [3D Sprint 2.0] can also accommodate .stl, .obj, and .ply file inputs.”

“The system is easily scalable and flexible, to adapt to rapid material and print technology innovation…this tool can help accomplish modeling objectives for 3D printing applications, which reduces the need for any additional software.  There are also easy-to-use modeling wizards available, that come with their own automated tools…you have the option of loading 3D Sprint 2.0 build files created on another system directly to your printer, or submitting print jobs directly from the Print Workspace.”

“Users are now able to effectively streamline their 3D printing processes with 3D Sprint 2.0, which can decrease the cost of ownership for any 3D Systems plastics 3D printers, as you’ll no longer need to purchase expensive software seats from any third-party vendors.”

Ian Sayers, 3D Printer and Scanner Sales for Hawk Ridge Systems, which is a partner of 3D Systems, put it best: “3D Sprint 2.0 is the fastest and most reliable user interface we’ve ever used.  Having a single piece of intelligent software [capable of creating] estimates on numerous virtual machines makes our operations more nimble, and the level of interoperability sets a new standard for what people will expect from 3D printing interfaces in the future.”

What new standards for other aspects of the 3D printing industry will we see in the coming year?

Stay tuned to Replicator World to discover right along with us!

 

Image Courtesy of TCT Magazine

Quotes Courtesy of TCT Magazine, 3D Printing Progress, and 3D Print  

 

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3D Printing Breathes New Life into Snowboarding Industry

The Burlington Free Press explains a common problem for snowboarding enthusiasts: the “hassle of bending down – or sitting down in the snow – to buckle boots into the bindings while skiers in their group wait.”  Obviously, this is not an ideal situation.

But as with many industries before this one, 3D printing is here to help.  “A new technology…enables the boot to snap onto the board similar to a ski binding…after more than four years of research and more than a decade of trying to find the answer to a question, [which] has long perplexed snowboarders and manufacturers alike, Burton Snowboards is releasing its new Step-On binding – touting it as a time-saver, [which] won’t negatively impact performance.  The binding goes on sale next fall and will run between $250 and $400.”

Of course, Burton Snowboards’s new Step-On binding was developed with the help of 3D printing.  This technology “made it possible for developers at Burton to crank out and refine hundreds of prototypes in a very short time.”

These new bindings will potentially increase interest in an industry growing at a “microscopic” rate.  As Chris Cunningham, Burton’s Vice President of Product explains, “we asked the question, ‘what if?’  What if I could save 30 seconds per run?”

“Multiplied by the 10 to 15 runs an average rider logs on any given day, a 30-second difference could mean an extra trip down the mountain per day.  Over [a number of] years, [this] number could add up into the hundreds.”

All in all, Burton Snowboards’s new Step-On binding means “less delay, less getting hands wet while fiddling with straps and buckles, [and ultimately] less time the skiers in the group have to wait around for their snowboard[ing] buddies to prepare their equipment after they get off the lift.”

Image Courtesy of Burton Snowboards

Quotes Courtesy of The Burlington Free Press

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Next Dynamics Launches NexD1 3D Printer

TechCrunch was on hand to witness a demonstration of Next Dynamics’s brand new desktop 3D printer, the NexD1.  NexD1’s “six cartridge/six print head system (each sporting 200 tiny nozzles) is capable of printing up to six [different] materials at once with a precision of up to 10 microns.”

Next Dynamics explains the NexD1’s system is “essentially a shrunken down and rejiggered version of Stratasys’ PolyJet technology (deemed “DigiJet” by the startup), [which] releases droplets of liquid polymer, [which] are then cured into place with UV light.”

NexD1 is also capable of printing in “different colors, [with] different malleability, and perhaps most interesting of all, the ability to embed circuitry directly into a project.  Among the various print materials, the startup will provide is a copper-based solution for conduction, [making] it possible to build circuits into a full printed piece.”

While the NexD1 is quite large for a desktop 3D printer, it is still possible to fit it into a cramped space.  “It sports a 20 cm x 20 cm build platform and operates…quietly…the printer itself looks a bit like 3D Systems’ old Cube desktop printer, with a full color touchscreen built directly into the front [which] sports a fairly simple UI for jobs the user transfers over via built in WiFi.”

On top of the NexD1 3D Printer are “slots for material cartridges – simple cardboard boxes full of liquid resin with nozzles that look a bit like milk cartons.  Those are set to run $50 to $60 at full retail.”

As for print speed, the New Dynamics team demonstrated the NexD1 printing out Arduino shields – apparently, it takes two and a half hours for it to complete projects such as these.  “This isn’t the sort of printing technology you’re going to want to deploy for direct manufacturing, but the precision on the finished product is pretty impressive, and the detail looks to be in line with [3D printed objects] from Formlabs, rather than MakerBot.”

The New Dynamics NexD1 3D Printer begins shipping this month and costs around $5,499.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of TechCrunch

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That’s No Moon!

In anticipation of last month’s release of the latest Star Wars movie, Rogue One (a prequel to the original Star Wars set during the dark times of the Galactic Civil War), the city of Madrid, Spain had something special planned.

As reported by 3Ders, “a giant 3D printer in downtown Madrid is currently fabricating a huge two-meter-wide 3D printed Death Star…the large-scale 3D printer was provided by US company ErectorBot.”

“Star Wars franchise owner Disney…asked…ErectorBot to ship over one of its massive machines so it can be used in a public 3D printing of a huge plastic Death Star…The giant FDM 3D printer, whose installation was approved by the Madrid municipality, is located in the famous Puerta de Alcala square, and is enclosed in a large glass cube.”

This large glass cube “allows spectators to monitor the printing progress of the populous, planet-destroying orb…the plastic Death Star is being printed in PLA, and will measure two meters in diameter and weigh over 100 kilograms once completed.”

“Rogue One: A Star Wars Story has its Spanish premiere on December 15th, and the 3D printed Death Star should be finished three days after that.”

May the force be with this ErectorBot!

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Disney, Lucasfilm, and 3Ders

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2016-12-19_09h47_43

Researchers Develop 3D Printed Heart Valve Models

3D Printing Progress reports on yet another fascinating biomedical breakthrough facilitated by 3D printing.

Researchers from the Georgia Tech Manufacturing Institute and the Piedmont Heart Institute have collaborated to create a tool to aid cardiologists plan surgeries with far more precision for patients with heart valve disease.

“Using highly detailed imaging from CT scans, mechanical engineers are using 3D printers to make an exact model of an individual patient’s heart valve.  These one-of-a-kind models not only represent the size and proportion of the heart valve but can also mimic its physiological qualities – such as how it feels and responds to pressure.”

Heart valve disease, or more accurately aortic stenosis, is a condition where “the valves in the left side of the heart narrow, restricting blood flow and potentially leading to heart failure…the 3D printed heart valve models are particularly useful in planning a minimally invasive procedure called transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), during which heart doctors use a catheter to deliver a prosthetic heart valve to replace the patient’s impaired valve.”

As Chuck Zhang, a professor in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering explains: “the prosthetic valves are readily available in a range of types and sizes from multiple manufacturers; however, one of the most important factors for a positive outcome is matching up the patient’s natural heart valve with a prosthetic of the right type and size.  That’s where the 3D model comes into play.  The issue is, everybody is different.  [For example,] a male will be different than a female.  It’s a big challenge for the doctors to select the right type of…prosthesis for a specific patient.”

Zhen Qian, chief of Cardiovascular Imaging Research at the Piedmont Heart Institute adds: “the 3D printed models hold great promise for use in preparing for heart procedures.  The results are quite encouraging.  Our printed model is able to tell you before the procedure how much paravalvular leakage there will be and where it is, a good indicator for short and long-term mortality.”

These models are printed using a multimaterial 3D printer.  Additionally, “Zhang has been experimenting with embedding sensors on the models as well, using a machine that can print nanomaterial-enabled circuitry on the wall of the valve.  The sensors could potentially be used to monitor how much a prosthetic valve strains or deforms the model.  With this sensing capability, the printed heart valve also can be used as a phantom to monitor pre-surgery practice.”

“So far, the researchers have printed almost two dozen heart valve models based on actual patient imaging.”  As Zhang predicts: “there is big potential for these models.  We’re thinking in the future, this may be a standard tool for pre-surgery planning and for training new surgeons.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Progress

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Australian Authorities Seize 3D Printed Weapons Stash

As reported by News.com.au, “a 3D printer allegedly used to print guns was seized in police raids on a Melbourne [Australia] organized crime syndicate.  Seven men and two women were arrested, while 14 guns, two stolen vehicles, cash, and drugs were [seized as well.]”

These arrests came mere weeks after a separate police raid in Queensland “charged five people after finding homemade machine guns and what police described as a weapons factory in a property on the Gold Coast.”

It would appear criminals are forcing authorities to become tech savvy.  In fact, a year ago, “NSW passed Australian-first legislation which included a ban on possessing files used to 3D print guns, which carries a maximum penalty of 14 years in prison.”  Specifically, this law states: “a person must not possess a digital blueprint for the manufacture of a firearm on a 3D printer or an electronic milling machine.”

Thomas Birtchnell, a senior lecturer at the University of Wollongong who specializes in 3D printing and manufacturing does not believe this Melbourne crime syndicate could currently fire any of their 3D printed weapons: “Most likely they were attempting to manufacture plastic handguns by using a [desktop FDM 3D printer].”  However, Birtchnell is wary of a time when metal 3D printing allows easy access to this sort of production:

“it’s been proven that you can manufacture on a 3D printer a workable metal firearm of professional quality.  The problem there is…the cost of those printers is $500,000 to $1 million so they are out of…league [for] most criminal gangs and organizations [for now]…We will see a step change if metal 3D printing becomes consumer level.”

Indeed, Aurora Labs, also based in Australia, is just one example of a company “pioneering cost-effective metal 3D printing.”  In fact, Aurora Labs has been “in talks with NASA about using its tech.  In the past, it has had a crowdfunding campaign to sell a $100,000 metal 3D printer.”

As Mr. Birtchnell concludes, “I mean $100,000 is probably accessible for a well-funded criminal gang…so you are starting to see that kind of activity going on.  Metal 3D printing really is the Holy Grail for the industry, so on the back of that it would be really beneficial for criminal gangs as well.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of News.com.au

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Medical Researchers Create Natural Blood Vessels With a 3D Bio-Printer

TCT Magazine reports on yet another astounding medical breakthrough fueled by the wonder of 3D printing.

“A group of Chinese medical researchers have used 3D printing to create natural blood vessels.  Scientists at Sichuan Revotek developed the world’s first bio-printer in 2015 and have finally begun to produce fully functional blood vessels.  The process uses bio ink made up of living stem cells from rhesus monkeys, before the printer fuses layers of new cells to the old ones.”  Eventually, the new and old cells will start growing as one.

Kang Yujian, Chief Scientist at Sichuan Revotek, explains: “in five days, the new layer of endodermis will be formed.  Meanwhile, the smooth muscle cells will grow as well.  Within 28 days all these cells will go through tissue differentiation.  That means the tissue we implanted will have mingled with the original ones and grow into a regular vessel.  This is unprecedented.”

Following the development of this astounding bio-printer, the scientists began experimenting on 30 rhesus monkeys.  “After months of observation, scientists discovered the 3D printed vessels had completely blended.”  More importantly, all the monkeys remained in good condition as well.

Sichuan Revotek’s new bio-printer is so efficient “ten-centimeter blood vessels can be printed in just two minutes, thanks to its two nozzles.  At the heart of the technology is a stem cell culture system.  This consists of seed cells and bio-links filled with growth factors and nutrients.  When combined with other materials, the 3D bioprinter creates layered cell structures, [which] can be cultivated to form tissues with other physiological functions.”

Dai Kerong, an Academic at the Chinese Academy of Engineering, is astounded at this marvel: “printing 3D blood vessels is quite remarkable.  If we can apply this technology to blood vessels then we can also use it on livers, kidneys, and other organs.  That is how groundbreaking this technology is.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of TCT Magazine

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2016-12-19_09h46_45

Autodesk Research Releases Software for Making Instruments from 3D Printed Objects

Gizmodo reports on exciting new software developed by Autodesk Research.  Printone Software “turns any 3D printed model into a playable instrument.”  Indeed, “anyone with access to a 3D printer and this simple software…can turn any 3D model into a wind instrument capable of playing a variety of different notes.”

How does it work?  Well… “once you’ve imported the 3D model you want transformed into an instrument, the Printone Software automatically creates a hollow cavity inside which allows air to resonate and actually produce a sound.  The software also allows a user to place the mouthpiece anywhere on the model so…it’s easy to blow into.”

In order “to specify a range of notes the instrument can produce, Printone [subsequently] has users place and size holes all over the 3D model while the software generates a real-time preview of the sound and specific note the instrument will [produce].”

Additionally, Autodesk Research’s new software “can automatically position and adjust the size of the holes on the 3D model so…it hits [specific target notes] while played.”  Using a standard desktop 3D printer, users can then turn the 3D model into an actual, living, breathing instrument.

Image Courtesy of Autodesk Research

Quotes Courtesy of Gizmodo

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3D Printed Smart Golf Club Prototype to be Showcased at CES 3D Printing Marketplace

TCT Magazine reports on a golfing related showcase to be unveiled at the CES 3D Printing Marketplace 2017 hosted by Las Vegas January 5th through January 8th.

CRP Group and CRP USA are presenting “what they believe to be the world’s first Smart Golf Club.  Their prototype, made in collaboration with Krone Golf, possesses a dual 9-axis motion sensor, Launch Monitor, and a Professional Instructor seamlessly integrated into the club.”

“The Smart Club is made with Windform Additive Manufacturing and Titanium CNC machined by CRP Group on behalf of Krone Golf, similar to the KD-1 [golf club] launched [in 2016].  The KD-1 is a functional golf club, also made in collaboration with Krone Golf, which is more lightweight.  Additive manufacturing techniques, along with the use of Windform, have also improved the speed, precision, design flexibility, and part optimization.”

As for the Smart Club, motion sensors are incorporated into its head and grip: “With sensors active to take data in real-time, it can detect inefficiencies in a player’s swing.  Using a mobile and tablet app, which holds all the data, the user can then be coached on how to improve with a series of tips and drills.”

“The Krone Linked system can precisely measure the location and speed of the club head and grip during a complete swing.  Meanwhile, the mass of the sensors has been carefully calculated and strategically positioned.  More than 500 data points are collected and instantly processed through proprietary algorithms to calculate golf metrics such as club path at impact, face angle, angle of attack, ball speed, launch angle, spin rate, carry distance, and total distance.  This data will then be wirelessly transmitted to the user’s smartphone or tablet.”

It should be a fun showcase!

Image and Quotes Courtesy of TCT Magazine

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3D Systems Launches 3D Sprint 2.0

3D Print reports on yet another software launch from 3D printing giant 3D Systems.  3D Sprint 2.0 is the latest iteration of software for several of the company’s plastics 3D printers.

Specifically, 3D Sprint 2.0 will work with ProJet 1200 and ProJet MJP 2500 series printers “and will begin shipping with these immediately.  3D Systems will announce at a later date when [this updated software] will support their other plastics 3D printers.”

3D Sprint 2.0 “reduces the need for users to divide projects between multiple software programs, thus streamlining the 3D printing workflows into a simplified process and saving users time and money.”

Brand new “software features [allow users to perform] advanced operations like part splitting, offsetting, and part quality checks.  [3D Sprint 2.0] can also accommodate .stl, .obj, and .ply file inputs.”

“The system is easily scalable and flexible, to adapt to rapid material and print technology innovation…this tool can help accomplish modeling objectives for 3D printing applications, which reduces the need for any additional software.  There are also easy-to-use modeling wizards available, that come with their own automated tools…you have the option of loading 3D Sprint 2.0 build files created on another system directly to your printer, or submitting print jobs directly from the Print Workspace.”

“Users are now able to effectively streamline their 3D printing processes with 3D Sprint 2.0, which can decrease the cost of ownership for any 3D Systems plastics 3D printers, as you’ll no longer need to purchase expensive software seats from any third-party vendors.”

Ian Sayers, 3D Printer and Scanner Sales for Hawk Ridge Systems, which is a partner of 3D Systems, put it best: “3D Sprint 2.0 is the fastest and most reliable user interface we’ve ever used.  Having a single piece of intelligent software [capable of creating] estimates on numerous virtual machines makes our operations more nimble, and the level of interoperability sets a new standard for what people will expect from 3D printing interfaces in the future.”

Image Courtesy of 3D Systems

Quotes Courtesy of 3D Print

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Laika Studios Continues to Take Advantage of 3D Printing Possibilities

Throughout the years, Replicator World has reported on the stop motion animation innovations Laika Studios continues to create using the wonders of 3D printing.

This year is no different.

As 3D Printing Industry investigated, like its predecessors, Coraline and The Boxtrolls, Kubo and the Two Strings, the latest feature film created by Laika Studios, relied heavily on 3D printing.  Nominated for a Golden Globe, Kubo had a budget of almost $60 million.

3D printing techniques were primarily used “in order to create thousands of different expressions on the characters’ faces.  The extraordinary amount of possibilities opened up through 3D printing is evident in the movie’s protagonist Kubo.  The figure of Kubo used to create the film is only 9 inches tall yet [it] has 11,007 unique mouth positions, 4,429 brow motions, and a total of 23,187 different faces.  Combined, this makes 48 million different possible expressions.”

As you can guess, without the aid of 3D printing, the creation of all those expressions would have been a herculean task.  But now it’s just a question of tweaking a base 3D model.  Laika Studios used a Stratasys Connex3 color multi-material 3D printer.  On top of all this, the studio even developed “their first fully 3D printed puppet, the Moon Beast.”  It was made out of 881 different parts.

“3D printing helped Laika Studios develop…efficient workflow…as instead of manipulating clay in between shots, as [is the stop motion animator’s more traditional technique], the studio had an array of detailed parts which could be interchanged accordingly.”

Perhaps even more exciting are the possibilities 3D printing brings to the stop motion animation industry at large.  “While blockbuster movies and big budget advertisements are using 3D printing to create stop motion filming, the technology is also available for small-scale productions.  Filmmakers on a budget have the ability to 3D scan objects on a smartphone and print them on a desktop 3D printer.  This means even lower budget productions can tap into a wide range of possibilities for their stop motion filmmaking.”

Image Courtesy of Laika Studios and Digital Trends

Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry

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Massivit 3D and OMUS Create “World’s First” 3D Printed Pop-Up Retail Store

Massivit 3D Printing Technologies, based out of Lod, Israel, recently sent out a press release.  The company’s customer, OMUS, “a specialist 3D print provider in Australia, has constructed what is believed to be the world’s first 3D printed pop-up retail store on behalf of luxury fashion brand Louis Vuitton.”

OMUS recently installed a Massivit 1800 3D Printer, and in just 18 days it produced this “9m-wide, 10m-long and 2.7m-high (29.5ft x 32.8ft x 8.85ft) structure” which is “currently capturing the gaze of shoppers at Sydney’s Westfield Shopping Center” in Australia.

OMUS teamed up with “Louis Vuitton’s design agency, Gold Coast Displays [and were tasked with producing] a statement megastructure [serving] as an attention-grabbing platform for the premiere of the brand’s latest menswear collection.”  They were only given three weeks’ notice!

As Robert Grosso, OMUS’s co-owner explains: “having received the design brief, we essentially needed to produce a visually-stunning, structurally-sound outlet that could endure sustained use in a busy public environment – and in record time.  Given the complexity of the design and the short turnaround time, 3D printing was really the only viable production method available to us.”

“Utilizing the Massivit 1800’s unrivalled print speed of up to 35 cm/14” per hour, two printers were deployed around the clock, each using dual print heads to produce two hollow panels simultaneously.  A total of 30 panels were 3D printed and would serve as the walls of the pop-up outlet.”

In the end, Grosso enthused about the process: “Louis Vuitton and its design agency were delighted with the finished result; it surpassed their expectations in terms of its striking visual appeal and realized their original vision to radiate the opulence of the company’s safari-inspired men’s line.  Their staff are also happy to explain to visitors how 3D printing was pivotal to the project and how it encapsulates Louis Vuitton’s innovation and fresh-thinking attitude.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Massivit 3D and OMUS

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