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Guns, Toilets, and Dragons: This Month in 3D Printing

Let us begin this month’s tour of the world of 3D printing with some very serious news, which could send dire ramifications rippling through the future.

PC Magazine reports reports on a settlement reached between the Trump Administration’s US Department of Justice and ‘gun rights activist’ Cody Wilson, of Defense Distributed fame.

Of course, Cody Wilson and Defense Distributed are hard to forget.  In 2013, “Wilson began uploading 3D printable CAD files to create a working plastic gun, called the “Liberator.”  This drew the attention of federal authorities; the US State Department demanded Wilson pull down the files, claiming he was violating an export rule on distributing secret military hardware.  In response, Wilson eventually took the US government to court; he’s been arguing that the First Amendment protects his constitutional right to share the 3D files as free speech.”

And now, due to the settlement, Wilson has gotten his wish.  Wilson is ecstatic: “I consider it a truly grand thing.  It will be an irrevocable part of political life that guns are downloadable and we helped to do that.”  Wilson plans to relaunch his website, Defcad, where he will resume uploading blueprints for firearms.

Apparently, the Trump Administration’s Justice Department approached Wilson with the settlement.  Under the terms of their new agreement, “the US government has agreed to change its export rules on military firearms, allowing Wilson [and others like him] to publish 3D firearm files without fear of legal penalty.”

The Second Amendment Foundation, who supported Wilson’s initial lawsuit, added: “significantly, the government expressly acknowledges non-automatic firearms up to .50-caliber – including modern semi-auto sporting rifles such as the popular AR-15 and similar firearms – are not inherently military.”

It is important to note the AR-15, a weapon often used by the military in combat situations, has specifically been used by mass shooters on multiple occasions.  This settlement has just made it easier for untraceable firearms to be 3D printed, by anyone.

Indeed, Wilson’s non-profit, Defense Distributed, “is seeking to become a digital warehouse for open source gun designs…[It is currently] offering a 3D printer for $1,675, capable of fabricating a metallic lower receiver to [that very same] AR-15 rifle.”

An Update to this story: A few days before Defense Distributed was to legally upload these gun CAD files, they illegally uploaded them early.  One thousand people downloaded the AR-15 CAD files parts specifically before the files were once more taken down.

Now, a judge has temporarily stalled the uploading of these files.  House Democrats have put forward a bill blocking their upload as well.  Even President Trump is tweeting about this issue, saying: “I am looking into 3-D Plastic Guns being sold to the public. Already spoke to NRA, doesn’t seem to make much sense!”

This story is still developing…

In more lighthearted news, 3D printing will now be used to save the U.S. Air Force’s toilet budget.  Yes, you read that right!

3D Printing Industry writes of a bizarre scandal which recently cropped up concerning the budget for Air Force toilet seats.

U.S. Senator Chuck Grassley, in a recent letter, “demanded justification for the U.S. Department of Defense’s DoD expenditure on $10,000 military aircraft toilet seat covers.”  As Grassley put it: “the Air Force has been paying such an outrageous price for toilet seat lids over a long period of time without notice or question makes me wonder whether the DOD Office of the Inspector General (OIG) is asleep at the switch.”

Thankfully, Air Force officials have now “announced it will now pay $300 to produce the part thanks to 3D printing.”  Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics Dr. Will Roper explains the years-long debacle: “you’ll think, there’s no way it costs that.  It doesn’t, but you’re asking a company to produce it and they’re producing something else.  And for them to produce this part for us, they have to quit what they’re making now.  They’re losing revenue and profit.”

“The manufacturer of the C-5 cargo aircraft toilet seat covers stopped production in 2001, resulting in an increased overall cost for the parts.”  Now, however, Roper will be utilizing the Air Force’s 3D printing resources such as The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL).

Miraculously, the cost for these nefarious toilet seat lids will go down and the Air Force will once again be flush with cash.

3D printing wasn’t only affecting the United States this month, though.  Venture Beat reports on some exciting recent news concerning how 3D printing is bringing the past to life once more.

Around 250 years ago in the United Kingdom, during the reign of King George III, the Great Pagoda at Kew (a royal palace) was built, and it featured painted wooden dragons “[adorning] the octagonal corners of the pagoda.”  Sadly, during the 1780s, these dragons were removed in order to accommodate roof repairs.  “But they were never replaced, and rumors floated that the dragons served as payment for royal gambling debts.  Experts now believe the wood simply rotted over time.”

This is where 3D printing comes in.  As part of the final restoration for this palace (which also happens to be a UNESCO World Heritage site, has just recently been reopened to the public), “3D printer maker 3D Systems has installed 72 large-scale 3D printed dragons” to replace their wooden counterparts.

In order to complete the project, 3D Systems used “Geomagic software, Selective Laser Sintering (SLS), 3D printing, and high quality finishing.”  These new 3D printed dragons were created using “durable polyamide 12 nylon material capable of producing a look and feel comparable to the original dragons…The project involved scanning a wood-carved dragon with the Faro Design ScanArm into 3D Systems’ Geomagic Design X reverse engineering software. The CAD-designed dragons are hollow and are 60 percent lighter than wood alternatives.”

Historic Royal Palaces (HRP) commissioned these pieces, and their project director Craig Hatto explains their decision to go with 3D printing and 3D systems.  HRP knew the sculptures had to withstand the “inclement English weather.  We turned to 3D Systems to provide the rapid throughput, accurate details, and excellent finishing needed for this project.  The engineering skill of 3D Systems’ team, the opportunity to light-weight the dragon statues, and the material longevity of SLS 3D printing were key considerations for this project.”

The final step of this project involved 3D Systems’ “skilled artisans who hand-painted each” individual dragon.

And, yet another strange story in the world of 3D printing:

Digital Trends has picked up on a fascinating new device created by a 21-year-old.  Archie O’Brien originally developed his 3D printed underwater jetpack for a Product Design class at Loughborough University in the UK.

The idea for such an ingenious device came to O’Brien “when he saw a promotional video for the SEABOB, a handheld aqua scooter that is half jet-ski and half…foam float.”  Unfortunately, this aqua scooter costs $17,000 – which is hardly in a student’s budget.  So, O’Brien turned to 3D printing.  He may not be able to afford a SEABOB, but he could make one on his own!

First, O’Brien got to researching.  Then he got in touch with 3D Hubs, which is a “manufacturing platform providing affordable and fast 3D printing, CNC machining and injection-molding services.  He studied the design of high-end cars made by Lamborghini, McLaren, and Aston Martin.”  Obviously, his interest in aesthetics has really paid off.

Speaking of his 3D printed underwater jetpack, O’Brien says: “I want this to be something so cool that you’re wearing it when you’re not even using it.  [I want you to] feel like James Bond.”  Evidently, O’Brien wants to start dressing like James Bond as well, because he wants to sell his ‘CUDA’ jetpack soon: “By this time next year, I’m planning on having the production model…I plan to get sponsored by GoPro and Red Bull.  The idea is to be able to produce this one, get enough funding to reinvest it into the company, and try and make a much cheaper model. That’s almost working it like Tesla did, with something that really grabs people’s attention, and then bringing that price down to something people can afford more.”

Hopefully, the almost exclusively 3D printed CUDA jetpack will reach its targeted Q2 2019 date for first production models.

Image Courtesy of PC Magazine

Quotes Courtesy of PC Magazine, 3D Printing Industry, 3D Systems, Venture Beat, and Digital Trends

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The People’s Army: A 3D Printed Board Game

3DPrint reports on a brand new board game produced by game design studio Bearded Giant Games.  One of their designers, Ciprian Bacioiu, who has worked for such prestigious companies as Gameloft and Disney, has designed a game incorporating the heavy utilization of 3D printing technology.

Bacioiu explains his new game, ‘The People’s Army’: “it’s a physical board game for the digital era!  It’s designed to be played in quick sessions (like most of the games under the Bearded Giant Games catalog) by two players (with the possibility of adding more seats to the game). And, just like my other games, it’s hackable, modable and procedural in nature. Everything from the board pieces to the release of the STL files has been designed with modding and hacking in mind.”

The game features three player types: the People, the Army, and the Dictators/Autocrats.  It also features three building types: Cities, Barracks, and the House of Parliament.  As a result of these systems, “the game is modular and designed to allow for expansion and customization.  It comes with 20 map templates, and users can create their own if they want.  The game pieces were prototyped at low resolution on a Wanhao i3 Mini for playtesting, and the final version will be 3D printed as well – for customers who choose to purchase it pre-made and assembled.  That’s one of the options, and the other is to buy the STL files and print them yourself.”

The price for The People’s Army has yet to be released, but Bacioiu assures players who “purchase the physical version of the game will also get access to the STL files, so they can print more pieces and customize their own if they choose to.”

Bacioiu concludes: “There’s a reason I went indie: I wanted the freedom to experiment with several concepts…I’m happy to say 3D printing will be a core-part of my business and design model from now on, be it in the form of physical board games, AR experiments with printed tokens or collectibles for the main games.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3DPrint

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Lockheed Martin 3D Prints Gigantic Titanium Parts for Space

Popular Mechanics reports on the exciting conclusion to a multi-year development program spearheaded by Lockheed Martin.

This project, which is squarely centered in the small satellite industry, involved 3D printing a gigantic titanium dome for fuel tanks.  “Engineers finished testing the 4-foot-diameter cap this month…Two domes will seal giant, high-pressure tanks carrying satellite fuel.  The company will now offer the tank as a standard option for its LM 2100 satellite buses.”

As with other projects Lockheed has used 3D printing for, the technology has “slashed time and expense from tooling and R&D prototyping.”  Prior to the completion of this particular project, “the largest 3D printed spacecraft part was the size of a toaster.  Now Lockheed is making huge pieces of titanium this way.”

As Lockheed Martin’s Space Executive Vice President Rick Ambrose explains: “our largest 3D printed parts to date show we’re committed to a future where we produce satellites twice as fast and at half the cost.”

Even though titanium is lightweight and strong, which makes it ideal for spacecraft, using it with traditional manufacturing methods “led to more than 80 percent of the material going to waste while making the satellite domes.”  Now, with the help of 3D printing, Ambrose adds delivery time “has dropped from two years to three months.”  That’s an incredible acceleration of manufacturing time!

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Popular Mechanics

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Desktop Metal Appoints Jeffrey Immelt to Board of Directors

TCT Magazine reports on Desktop Metal’s recent announcement concerning Jeffrey Immelt, GE’s former Chairman & CEO.  It would seem the metal 3D printing company has announced the election of Immelt to its Board of Directors.  Immelt joins Dr. Ken Washington, vice president of Research and Advanced Engineering and former CTO at the Ford Motor Company.

Desktop Metal, which was founded in 2015, “has introduced two metal 3D printing systems to the market.”  These metal 3D printing systems include the “office-friendly Studio System for rapid prototyping, and a Production System for manufacturing metal parts at scale up to 100 times faster than today’s laser-based additive manufacturing systems.”  Desktop Metal has also secured investment from BMW I Ventures, GE Ventures, and the Ford Motor Company.

Desktop Metal, as can already be surmised, is very excited to bring Immelt on board.  “Immelt brings…over four decades of technology and business expertise, with the most recent leading GE’s global business development.”

As Desktop Metal Founder and CEO Ric Fulop expounds: “In addition to his experience leading one of the largest and most admired companies in the world, Jeff is a respected executive with a passion for technology and innovation.  His track record for driving creativity and on a global scale makes him a valuable addition to the board as we continue to drive Desktop Metal’s innovation and growth strategy.”

Immelt himself is also excited: “Since it was founded nearly three years ago, Desktop Metal has become a trailblazer across the additive manufacturing landscape and I have a tremendous respect for the company’s ability to innovate. I look forward to sharing my experiences and contributing to the future direction and growth of this emerging metal 3D printing pioneer.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of TCT Magazine

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Blowing a Lid: The Saga of the $10,000 Air Force Toilet Seat Covers

3D Printing Industry writes of a bizarre scandal which recently cropped up concerning the budget for Air Force toilet seats.

U.S. Senator Chuck Grassley, in a recent letter, “demanded justification for the U.S. Department of Defense’s DoD expenditure on $10,000 military aircraft toilet seat covers.”  As Grassley put it: “the Air Force has been paying such an outrageous price for toilet seat lids over a long period of time without notice or question makes me wonder whether the DOD Office of the Inspector General (OIG) is asleep at the switch.”

Thankfully, Air Force officials have now “announced it will now pay $300 to produce the part thanks to 3D printing.”  Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics Dr. Will Roper explains the years-long debacle: “you’ll think, there’s no way it costs that.  It doesn’t, but you’re asking a company to produce it and they’re producing something else.  And for them to produce this part for us, they have to quit what they’re making now.  They’re losing revenue and profit.”

“The manufacturer of the C-5 cargo aircraft toilet seat covers stopped production in 2001, resulting in an increased overall cost for the parts.”  Now, however, Roper will be utilizing the Air Force’s 3D printing resources such as The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL).

Miraculously, the cost for these nefarious toilet seat lids will go down and the Air Force will once again be flush with cash.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry

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French Family First Humans to Live Inside 3D Printed Home

The New Daily reports on some historic 3D printing news coming out of France.  Apparently, a French family have become the first humans to live (full time!) inside a 3D printed house.

This house was designed by a team of researchers from the University of Nantes.  The team devised it “as a social housing project in conjunction with the local council.”  This 3D printed home took only 54 hours to print, “and was built by a robot using a combination of a specialist plastic polymer and concrete.”

The house, which stands at an impressive 95-square-meters, “boasts a highly efficient insulation, and sensors monitoring air quality, humidity, and temperature.”  The team from the University of Nantes “hopes to transform the construction industry; making houses cheaper and more sustainable.”

This goal they have achieved.  In fact, the house “costs 20 percent less than an identical house built with traditional construction methods.”  As University of Nantes Professor Benoit Furet explains, “once you’ve printed it you’ve used very little material and produced zero waste.  The advantage of 3D printing is it enables us to have far richer solutions in terms of the shape of the house, much more interesting for architects than the traditional construction of straight walls.”

The council wished to “see if they can make this type of construction mainstream, and secondly, to see if the same construction principles can be applied to other public building such as sports halls and communal buildings.”

The council’s technology lead, Francky Trichet, concludes: “for 2000 years there hasn’t been a change in the paradigm of the construction process.  We wanted to sweep this whole construction process away.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of The New Daily

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Indiana University Partners with Lung Biotechnology PBC

3D Print reports on the announcement of an exciting new partnership in the field of 3D printed biotechnology.  Indiana University and Lung Biotechnology PBC have joined forces in order to expedite the arrival of 3D printed human organs.

Specifically, faculty at Indiana University (IU) School of Medicine have brokered a deal with the Maryland-based organ transplantation technologies company.  “The hope is that the $9 million project will result in the knowledge necessary to make the dream of 3D printing organs into a reality.”  The faculty at IU have already taken the first steps towards this eventual goal: they can already generate tissues via the wonders of 3D printing.

However, with the extra funds provided to them by this project and partnership, the researchers will “analyze the [3D printed] tissues and their structures in order to possibly unlock the key to more advanced organ creation.”

However, Dr. Lester Smith, who is an Assistant Professor of Radiology and Imaging Sciences at IU School of Medicine, explains just how long this project will take – and the reasons for its length: “[I]f someone has a skin burn, maybe we can replace skin. Or if someone has a bad liver then we can replace the liver entirely. But this is way down the road. Most of our tissues which make up our organs have a lot of different cell types. They are also vascularized, which means they have a lot of blood vessels that are basically channeling through them. When we get there that’s when I can tell you how long it took. That’s because the body is so complex and there are so many different parts and so many responses. I couldn’t tell you how long it would take but we’re on the road to that destination.”

Of course, there is great hope for 3D printed organs – we’ll just have to wait for them a little while longer.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Indiana University and 3D Print

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Recreating 250-Year-Old Dragon Sculptures with 3D Printing

Venture Beat reports on some exciting recent news concerning how 3D printing is bringing the past to life once more.

Around 250 years ago in the United Kingdom, during the reign of King George III, the Great Pagoda at Kew (a royal palace) was built, and it featured painted wooden dragons “[adorning] the octagonal corners of the pagoda.”  Sadly, during the 1780s, these dragons were removed in order to accommodate roof repairs.  “But they were never replaced, and rumors floated that the dragons served as payment for royal gambling debts.  Experts now believe the wood simply rotted over time.”

This is where 3D printing comes in.  As part of the final restoration for this palace (which also happens to be a UNESCO World Heritage site, has just recently been reopened to the public), “3D printer maker 3D Systems has installed 72 large-scale 3D printed dragons” to replace their wooden counterparts.

In order to complete the project, 3D Systems used “Geomagic software, Selective Laser Sintering (SLS), 3D printing, and high quality finishing.”  These new 3D printed dragons were created using “durable polyamide 12 nylon material capable of producing a look and feel comparable to the original dragons…The project involved scanning a wood-carved dragon with the Faro Design ScanArm into 3D Systems’ Geomagic Design X reverse engineering software. The CAD-designed dragons are hollow and are 60 percent lighter than wood alternatives.”

Historic Royal Palaces (HRP) commissioned these pieces, and their project director Craig Hatto explains their decision to go with 3D printing and 3D systems.  HRP knew the sculptures had to withstand the “inclement English weather.  We turned to 3D Systems to provide the rapid throughput, accurate details, and excellent finishing needed for this project.  The engineering skill of 3D Systems’ team, the opportunity to light-weight the dragon statues, and the material longevity of SLS 3D printing were key considerations for this project.”

The final step of this project involved 3D Systems’ “skilled artisans who hand-painted each” individual dragon.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3D Systems and Venture Beat

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Downloadable Firearms Now Legal

PC Magazine reports on a settlement reached between the Trump Administration’s US Department of Justice and ‘gun rights activist’ Cody Wilson, of Defense Distributed fame.

Of course, Cody Wilson and Defense Distributed are hard to forget.  In 2013, “Wilson began uploading 3D printable CAD files to create a working plastic gun, called the “Liberator.”  This drew the attention of federal authorities; the US State Department demanded Wilson pull down the files, claiming he was violating an export rule on distributing secret military hardware.  In response, Wilson eventually took the US government to court; he’s been arguing that the First Amendment protects his constitutional right to share the 3D files as free speech.”

And now, due to the settlement, Wilson has gotten his wish.  Wilson is ecstatic: “I consider it a truly grand thing.  It will be an irrevocable part of political life that guns are downloadable and we helped to do that.”  Wilson plans to relaunch his website, Defcad, where he will resume uploading blueprints for firearms.

Apparently, the Trump Administration’s Justice Department approached Wilson with the settlement.  Under the terms of their new agreement, “the US government has agreed to change its export rules on military firearms, allowing Wilson [and others like him] to publish 3D firearm files without fear of legal penalty.”

The Second Amendment Foundation, who supported Wilson’s initial lawsuit, added: “significantly, the government expressly acknowledges non-automatic firearms up to .50-caliber – including modern semi-auto sporting rifles such as the popular AR-15 and similar firearms – are not inherently military.”

It is important to note the AR-15, a weapon often used by the military in combat situations, has specifically been used by mass shooters on multiple occasions.  This settlement has just made it easier for untraceable firearms to be 3D printed, by anyone.

Indeed, Wilson’s non-profit, Defense Distributed, “is seeking to become a digital warehouse for open source gun designs…[It is currently] offering a 3D printer for $1,675, capable of fabricating a metallic lower receiver to [that very same] AR-15 rifle.”

An Update to this story: A few days before Defense Distributed was to legally upload these gun CAD files, they illegally uploaded them early.  One thousand people downloaded the AR-15 CAD files parts specifically before the files were once more taken down.

Now, a judge has temporarily stalled the uploading of these files.  House Democrats have put forward a bill blocking their upload as well.  Even President Trump is tweeting about this issue, saying: “I am looking into 3-D Plastic Guns being sold to the public. Already spoke to NRA, doesn’t seem to make much sense!”

This story is still developing…

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New Zealand Government Gives $10 Million Boost for 3D Printing Start-Ups

3D Printing Industry reports on a brand new cash flow for the 3D printing industry – at least in New Zealand.  The New Zealand government, in collaboration with the University of Auckland (UoA), has announced they will be sending a $10 million boost for 3D printing start-ups to the ‘Entrepreneurial Universities programme.’

New Zealand’s Education Minister, Chris Hipkins, also announced the appointment of Professor Olaf Diegel to this project.  As Hipkins explains: “We are fortunate to have secured Professor Diegel, a world leader in creating new products that provide innovative solutions to engineering problems.  Professor Diegel’s work aims to establish New Zealand as a global leader in Additive Manufacturing (AM), a technique used to build 3D printing technology. AM has already been used by Kiwi start-up Rocket Lab to build its ground-breaking rocket motor that cleverly used parts made by 3D printers.”

As a result of this appointment, Professor Diegel will join UoA’s Faculty of Engineering in 2019.  Previously, Diegel “has been involved in the development of more than 100 products” during his time at additive manufacturing labs at Auckland University of Technology, Massey University, and Lund University.  These products include “an insulin cooling system commercialized by Medactive…and a metal 3D printed guitar.”

As Minister Hipkins concludes: “This project will fast-track New Zealand’s ability to develop more commercial products using AM. Professor Diegel has dedicated much of his career to developing entrepreneurship. He has been involved in seven university start-ups and was a board member of Lund University’s VentureLab helping students turn their ideas into start-ups.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry

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VEEM Teams Up with Aurora Labs

3D Printing Industry reports on a brand new partnership between VEEM and Aurora Labs.  VEEM is an Australian manufacturer of high technology marine propulsion and stabilization systems, while Aurora Labs is a metal 3D printer manufacturer.  The companies “have signed a five-year agreement to explore the uses of Aurora Labs’ 3D printing and large format technology.”

“This collaboration will potentially deliver cost and efficiency savings for the manufacture of VEEM’s specialist technology, which includes its propellers, fin systems, and gyrostabilizers – a marine device used reducing the rolling of boats and ships in waves.”

VEEM’s Managing Director Mark Miocevich explains: “There is huge potential in the use of 3D printing technology to manufacture a range of complex components used in VEEM products, medium and large format 3D printing, especially using metal alloys, [which are] notoriously challenging.”

This partnership will be helped by Aurora Labs’ S-Titanium Pro 3D printer, which uses LFP, DMLS, DMLM, and DED additive manufacturing processes.  As for VEEM’s technology, the Gyrostabilizer “has been used by Europe’s second largest shipbuilder, Damen, to conduct sea trials. Furthermore, the Gyrostabilizer was selected by Friere Shipyard, based in Spain, as the roll stabilization system for a 42 meter fishery patrol vessel for the Government of Kuwait.”

The agreement between VEEM and Aurora Labs will involve four distinct stages.  “In the first stage, VEEM will review and analyze Aurora Products and its potential capabilities. Secondly, Aurora will assist VEEM in the assessment of the potential value of utilizing Aurora’s technology and products in VEEM’s operations.  In the third stage, both companies will identify and evaluate the potential opportunities for government R&D funding towards projects related to its venture program. The fourth and final stage will include VEEM making an equity investment in Aurora Labs.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry

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3D Printed Underwater Jetpack

Digital Trends has picked up on a fascinating new device created by a 21-year-old.  Archie O’Brien originally developed his 3D printed underwater jetpack for a Product Design class at Loughborough University in the UK.

The idea for such an ingenious device came to O’Brien “when he saw a promotional video for the SEABOB, a handheld aqua scooter that is half jet-ski and half…foam float.”  Unfortunately, this aqua scooter costs $17,000 – which is hardly in a student’s budget.  So, O’Brien turned to 3D printing.  He may not be able to afford a SEABOB, but he could make one on his own!

First, O’Brien got to researching.  Then he got in touch with 3D Hubs, which is a “manufacturing platform providing affordable and fast 3D printing, CNC machining and injection-molding services.  He studied the design of high-end cars made by Lamborghini, McLaren, and Aston Martin.”  Obviously, his interest in aesthetics has really paid off.

Speaking of his 3D printed underwater jetpack, O’Brien says: “I want this to be something so cool that you’re wearing it when you’re not even using it.  [I want you to] feel like James Bond.”  Evidently, O’Brien wants to start dressing like James Bond as well, because he wants to sell his ‘CUDA’ jetpack soon: “By this time next year, I’m planning on having the production model…I plan to get sponsored by GoPro and Red Bull.  The idea is to be able to produce this one, get enough funding to reinvest it into the company, and try and make a much cheaper model. That’s almost working it like Tesla did, with something that really grabs people’s attention, and then bringing that price down to something people can afford more.”

Hopefully, the almost exclusively 3D printed CUDA jetpack will reach its targeted Q2 2019 date for first production models.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Digital Trends

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