Polaroid Nano Glide

3D Printing News from CES 2018

The 3D printing market just continues to grow.  This year, nowhere was this more apparent than at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

Before we dive in to the additive manufacturing-related announcements, however – let’s take a look at how the 3D printing market is being forecasted to develop within the next few years.

Itweb recently caught wind of IDC’s Worldwide Semiannual 3D Printing Spending Guide from International.  According to this report, IDC forecasts “global spending on 3D printing (including hardware, materials, software, and services) will be nearly $12 billion in 2018, an increase of 19.9% over 2017.”

“The research firm says by 2021, worldwide spending will be nearly $20 billion with a five-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 20.5%.  Together, 3D printers and materials will account for roughly two thirds of the worldwide spending total throughout the forecast, reaching $6.9 billion and $6.7 billion, respectively, in 2021.”  Services spending will account for $5.5 billion by then.

“IDTechEx forecasts the global market for 3D printing metals will reach a value of $12 billion by the year 2028…in 2017, several companies launched new printer technologies with the promise of overcoming some of the existing barriers to adoption, such as lower printer prices, faster build speeds, and cheaper materials.”

IDC “says the US will be the region with the largest spending total in 2018 ($4.1 billion) followed by Western Europe ($3.5 billion)…China will be the third largest region with more than $1.5 billion in spending this year, followed by Central and Eastern Europe, the Middle East & Africa, the rest of Asia/Pacific (excluding Japan)…the regions which will see the fastest growth over the 2017-2021 forecast period are Latin America (27.2% CAGR) and CEE (26% CAGR).

IDC’s Research Manager of Customer Insights and Analysis Marianne D’Aquila had this to say: “3D printing solutions have moved well beyond prototyping, to become prevalent within and across multiple industries.  Parts for new products, aftermarket parts, dental objects, and medical support objects will continue to see significant growth opportunities over the next five years as 3D printing becomes more mainstream.”

As for what’s happening in the immediate future in the world of 3D printing – we turn our attention, now, to the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, which took place last month.  New 3D printers (and related technologies) were being announced left and right:

The 3D printer manufacturer XYZprinting announced the launch of three new 3D printing products aimed at the Consumer 3D Printing Market.  Perhaps these products aren’t the Desktop 3D printers we’ve all been dreaming about, but are intended for other contexts and other applications.

As Forbes Magazine explains, XYZprinting’s new products are “aimed at schools, consumers, and small businesses.”  The first of these products is the da Vinci Color AiO, “a full color desktop 3D printer incorporating 3D scanning within the machine.”  As XYZprinting elaborates: “this machine combines inject and 3D printing together to allow for creating ‘true depth of color’ and industrial-grade performance.”  “This product is aimed at small businesses and schools – prototyping for the former, and education for the latter.”  The da Vinci Color AiO is priced at $3800.

Additionally, according to Tech Crunch, the da Vinci Color AiO features voice control.  “The service is limited at launch but eventually it will allow users to prep their print job, pause, calibrate, receive status updates, and conduct printer maintenance.”

As XYZprinting’s Associate Manager-U.S. Frank Peng explains: “the 3D printing industry is working together to utilize additive manufacturing’s advantages to better our lives and benefit the consumer’s product usage cycle.  So, ideally, what this means for voice recognition is a car company, such as Ford, would have the ability to keep a digital inventory of their parts and users would give a command of ‘search a 1999 Ford radio tuner for my car,’ and the part would be easily located and printed.”

XYZprinting is also launching the da Vinci Nano, “a compact 3D printer aimed at the home and school market.  With that in mind, the printer has a number of safety features as well as a plant-based filament, which doesn’t pose a safety risk.”  XYZprinting has also developed a K-12 curriculum for the printer, which it is offering to schools.

XYZprinting has also announced the da Vinci 3D Pen Cool, “a standalone 3D printing pen, which can be used to introduce the concept of 3D printing to kids and interested hobbyists for less than $50.”

Peng explains the company’s goals: “we do think the consumer market will take time to develop.  To help with that we also target the education market and work with schools to develop the next generation’s interest in 3D printing…We see a lot of potential in the consumer market.”

XYZprinting’s CEO Simon Shen concludes: “[our goal is to] provide casual users and small business owners the tools and confidence to try their hand at this technology and incorporate it into their everyday lives.”

Elsewhere, TCT Magazine reports on Airwolf 3D’s launch of its innovative desktop 3D printer, the EVO Additive Manufacturing Center.  “The EVO AMC marks Airwolf 3D’s fifth generation 3D printing system.  Its name derives from its apparent superior technology, design, and construction to rival desktop machines on the market: a company press release [boasts] how EVO is not ‘merely an industrial 3D printer, but a fully-fledged Additive Manufacturing Center.’”

The EVO AMC comes with your standard Airwolf features “such as auto-levelling, large build size, high temperature multi-material printing, and compatibility with water-soluble Hydrofill support material.  But it also delivers…PartSave [which] is a feature enabling the printer to carry on with the print it is working on after a power outage or the machine getting unplugged.  Once power is restored, manufacturing resumes.  Another [feature of EVO AMC] is FailSafe.  This comes into action when a jam occurs, or the user runs out of filament.  By placing the print head at the height it was at prior to the interruption, FailSafe will get the printer back to work and finishing the job.”

Erik Wolf, Airwolf 3D’s Co-Founder and CEO, concludes: “the EVO AMC is completely new and it’s unlike anything out there.  We took the technology we perfected with our prosumer line of 3D printer and leveraged it to develop a machine light years beyond anything else on the market.  The EVO AMC is faster, stronger, and more accurate than any other desktop 3D printer – it delivers a premium 3D manufacturing experience at less than half the cost of machines offering equivalent performances.  Plus, it’s packed with new technology dramatically changing the way we manufacture, including the ability to work in metals.  The EVO AMC far surpasses the capabilities of a traditional desktop 3D printer.  It’s a true desktop Additive Manufacturing Center.”

The EVO AMC is shipping this month.  Pricing starts at $6,995.

3Ders was on hand to witness yet another announcement at CES 2018:

Avi Reichental, former CEO of 3D Systems, is back with a new venture: Nexa3D.  This 3D printing company recently “partnered with BEGO and XYZprinting to jointly develop and commercialize 3D printing technology for the dental industry.  Under the agreement, BEGO will exclusively market and sell, under its own label, a special purpose high-speed Nexa3D dental printer, which will be manufactured by XYZprinting.”

Now, however, Nexa3D has just announced the launch of their brand new NXV SLA Printer at CES 2018.  “Priced at $19,950 per system, the NXV SLA 3D printer is capable of printing 30-micron XY resolutions.”  Additionally, the NXV 3D printer “is configured to run using both on-board and cloud controls for in-situ and remote operations – of either a single printer, or a full factory of printers.  Putting multiple NXVs together enables the mass production of customized parts.”

“The NXV is powered by [Nexa3D’s] proprietary Lubricant Sublayer Photo-curing (LSPc) technology and patented structured light matrix, which is capable of reaching top speeds of 1 cm per minute.  This phenomenal speed cuts the time needed for the 3D printing of precision functional parts from hours to minutes, making 3D printing a viable challenger to injection molding.”

As Reichental concludes: “3D printing is an unstoppable force of change in every industry.  High-speed 3D printing is the next frontier in additive manufacturing and one that is highly valued by end-users, strategic partners, resellers, and investors alike.  After several years of bootstrapping through the early stages of proving and nailing our game-changing technology we are” proud to launch the NXV SLA 3D printer.

Finally, Polaroid also made a few announcements at CES 2018 as well.

TCT Magazine was on hand at CES 2018 in Las Vegas when Polaroid announced the launch of four new desktop 3D printers.  Polaroid showcased “the Nano Duo, Nano Mini, Nano Glide, and Nano+…Polaroid is aiming to make the latest 3D printing technology accessible for consumers looking to implement [this kind of] machine in their home, classroom, or office.”

It was only two years ago when Polaroid first dipped their toe into the 3D printing arena with the launch of the ModelSmart250S 3D printer.  Apparently, Polaroid wishes to dive even further in.  As for their new 3D printing suite, the Polaroid Nano Duo “features dual-head printing, allowing the user to print two colors simultaneously, and with a built-in camera, which enables live monitoring of the build.  It supports a wide range of filament types, including ABS, wood, TPU, metal, and PLA, and has a build volume of 11.8 x 8.8 x 12.6 inches.”  The Duo will launch in April 2018 for $1849.  “Polaroid’s Nano Mini platform is described as a ‘plug and play’ option, with no prior 3D printing experience required to run the machine…It will be available for $349 in April 2018.”

“The Polaroid Nano Glide is a slightly larger platform with a sliding print bed measuring 4.7 x 4.7 x 4.7 inches” while the “Polaroid Nano+ is said to deliver fast, accurate, stable prints.”  The Nano Glide will be available in April 2018 for $479, while the Nano+ will launch in March 2018 for $549.

President and CEO of Polaroid, Scott W. Hardy, is very excited for these launches: “we’re proud to offer the latest in 3D printing technology to give users a new way to express themselves at a price point which puts the technology within reach for use in any home, school, or business.”

As CES 2018 demonstrated, the future looks bright for 3D printing technology.

Image Courtesy of TCT Magazine

Quotes Courtesy of Itweb, Forbes Magazine, Tech Crunch, XYZprinting, TCT Magazine, and 3Ders

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Published Plans for 3D Printing 200-Million-Year-Old Dino Skull

Newsline reports on the release of CAD files released for the purposes of 3D printing by scientists at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa.  Now, “anyone with access to a 3D printer can create a replica of a 200-million-year-old dinosaur skull.”

The researchers “used advanced CT scanning technology to image and digitally reconstruct – bone by bone – a detailed 3D model of the skull of Massospondylus, a sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic.”

The researchers published this rendering via the journal PeerJ.  “CT scans revealed new details about the connection between the dinosaur’s middle and inner ear.  The imaging also showed the pathways nerves took through the neck and head.”

Kimi Chapelle, a PhD student at the Evolutionary Studies Institute at Wits explains: “I was amazed when I started digitally reconstructing Massopondylus’ skull, and found all these features that had never been described.  It just goes to show researchers still have a lot to learn about South Africa’s dinosaurs…by comparing the inner ear to that of other dinosaurs, we can try and interpret things like how they held their heads and how they moved.”

3D printing is undoubtedly changing the way paleontologists interact with, and ultimately understand, fossils.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Newsline

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3D Printed Customizable Mini Trim Pieces

Digital Trends reports on a brand-new program launched by automobile manufacturer Mini: “BMW’s Mini division just announced a new program called Yours Customized which gives current and future owners the ability to design their own 3D printed trim pieces without going down the ‘do-it-yourself’ rabbit hole.”

For now, “the list of 3D printed parts is limited to the inlays integrated into the front fenders and the trim on the passenger side of the dashboard.  Customers can choose from five colors and a long list of different patterns and finishes, and they can add text or pick from a small selection of cityscapes.”

“Mini created a platform named Online Customizer to let owners configure the special components.  The parts are then 3D printed in Germany using high-quality plastic and sent back to the customer via the nearest dealer.  The company explains it takes no more than a few minutes to swap out the trim pieces and the process doesn’t require any special tools.  All the customer needs is a plastic clamp they can buy directly from Mini.”

Additionally, customers will be given the ability to sign their car.  “Using laser-lettering technology, Mini creates custom door sills engraved with anything ranging from the car’s name to the owner’s signature.  Buyers who want the full treatment can order custom-designed LED door projectors too.”

These 3D printed parts will be made available for the Mini Convertible and the two and four door variants of the Hardtop.  The door sills and other door projects will also be made available with the larger Clubman.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of BMW, Mini, and Digital Trends

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Nexa3D Launches NXV SLA Printer

3Ders reports on yet another 3D printing announcement and launch at CES 2018.

Avi Reichental, former CEO of 3D Systems, is back with a new venture: Nexa3D.  This 3D printing company recently “partnered with BEGO and XYZprinting to jointly develop and commercialize 3D printing technology for the dental industry.  Under the agreement, BEGO will exclusively market and sell, under its own label, a special purpose high-speed Nexa3D dental printer, which will be manufactured by XYZprinting.”

Now, however, Nexa3D has just announced the launch of their brand new NXV SLA Printer at CES 2018.  “Priced at $19,950 per system, the NXV SLA 3D printer is capable of printing 30-micron XY resolutions.”  Additionally, the NXV 3D printer “is configured to run using both on-board and cloud controls for in-situ and remote operations – of either a single printer, or a full factory of printers.  Putting multiple NXVs together enables the mass production of customized parts.”

“The NXV is powered by [Nexa3D’s] proprietary Lubricant Sublayer Photo-curing (LSPc) technology and patented structured light matrix, which is capable of reaching top speeds of 1 cm per minute.  This phenomenal speed cuts the time needed for the 3D printing of precision functional parts from hours to minutes, making 3D printing a viable challenger to injection molding.”

As Reichental concludes: “3D printing is an unstoppable force of change in every industry.  High-speed 3D printing is the next frontier in additive manufacturing and one that is highly valued by end-users, strategic partners, resellers, and investors alike.  After several years of bootstrapping through the early stages of proving and nailing our game-changing technology we are” proud to launch the NXV SLA 3D printer.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3Ders

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Airwolf 3D Launches EVO Additive Manufacturing Center

TCT Magazine reports on Airwolf 3D’s launch of its innovative desktop 3D printer, the EVO Additive Manufacturing Center.  The EVO was announced at CES 2018.

“The EVO AMC marks Airwolf 3D’s fifth generation 3D printing system.  Its name derives from its apparent superior technology, design, and construction to rival desktop machines on the market: a company press release [boasts] how EVO is not ‘merely an industrial 3D printer, but a fully-fledged Additive Manufacturing Center.’”

The EVO AMC comes with your standard Airwolf features “such as auto-levelling, large build size, high temperature multi-material printing, and compatibility with water-soluble Hydrofill support material.  But it also delivers…PartSave [which] is a feature enabling the printer to carry on with the print it is working on after a power outage or the machine getting unplugged.  Once power is restored, manufacturing resumes.  Another [feature of EVO AMC] is FailSafe.  This comes into action when a jam occurs, or the user runs out of filament.  By placing the print head at the height it was at prior to the interruption, FailSafe will get the printer back to work and finishing the job.”

Erik Wolf, Airwolf 3D’s Co-Founder and CEO, concludes: “the EVO AMC is completely new and it’s unlike anything out there.  We took the technology we perfected with our prosumer line of 3D printer and leveraged it to develop a machine light years beyond anything else on the market.  The EVO AMC is faster, stronger, and more accurate than any other desktop 3D printer – it delivers a premium 3D manufacturing experience at less than half the cost of machines offering equivalent performances.  Plus, it’s packed with new technology dramatically changing the way we manufacture, including the ability to work in metals.  The EVO AMC far surpasses the capabilities of a traditional desktop 3D printer.  It’s a true desktop Additive Manufacturing Center.”

The EVO AMC is shipping this month.  Pricing starts at $6,995.

Image and Quotes Courtesy of TCT Magazine

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Polaroid Launches Four Desktop 3D Printers

TCT Magazine was on hand at CES 2018 in Las Vegas when Polaroid announced the launch of four new desktop 3D printers.  Polaroid showcased “the Nano Duo, Nano Mini, Nano Glide, and Nano+…Polaroid is aiming to make the latest 3D printing technology accessible for consumers looking to implement [this kind of] machine in their home, classroom, or office.”

It was only two years ago when Polaroid first dipped their toe into the 3D printing arena with the launch of the ModelSmart250S 3D printer.  Apparently, Polaroid wishes to dive even further in.  As for their new 3D printing suite, the Polaroid Nano Duo “features dual-head printing, allowing the user to print two colors simultaneously, and with a built-in camera, which enables live monitoring of the build.  It supports a wide range of filament types, including ABS, wood, TPU, metal, and PLA, and has a build volume of 11.8 x 8.8 x 12.6 inches.”  The Duo will launch in April 2018 for $1849.  “Polaroid’s Nano Mini platform is described as a ‘plug and play’ option, with no prior 3D printing experience required to run the machine…It will be available for $349 in April 2018.”

“The Polaroid Nano Glide is a slightly larger platform with a sliding print bed measuring 4.7 x 4.7 x 4.7 inches” while the “Polaroid Nano+ is said to deliver fast, accurate, stable prints.”  The Nano Glide will be available in April 2018 for $479, while the Nano+ will launch in March 2018 for $549.

President and CEO of Polaroid, Scott W. Hardy, is very excited for these launches: “we’re proud to offer the latest in 3D printing technology to give users a new way to express themselves at a price point which puts the technology within reach for use in any home, school, or business.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of TCT Magazine

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Russian Researchers Ready to Release Ultrasonic Levitational 3D Printer by 2020

3Ders reports on the announcement of a target set by Russian researchers.  By 2020, scientists working at Tomsk State University believe they will be able to release an ultrasonic levitational 3D printer.

This 3D printer will have the ability to levitate small particles in an acoustic field.  This technology will be “useful for hot or chemically aggressive solutions and substances.”  This new kind of “ultrasonic 3D printing uses levitation to lift small particles of foam plastic…the system will purportedly use an anechoic chamber covered with wave absorbers and emitters.  A stream of acoustic waves (40 kHz) will serve to suspend the foam plastic particles in mid-air, while power levels will be able to be adjusted to increase the ‘number and size’ of the particles.  Tailor made software will be used to move the levitated particles from side to side.”

This sounds incredibly innovative, “but it won’t be the first practical use of levitation for manufacturing purposes…but the TSU researchers don’t just want to perfect the art of levitation.  Rather, they have some particular 3D printing applications in mind for their new technology: the installation of components on printed circuit boards, the handling of dangerous chemical substances, and potentially other uses too.”

The researchers at TSU have been “helped along by a generous grant from the Russian Science Foundation – to the tune of 15 million rubles ($266,000).”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3Ders

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Chocolate Factory Replaces Machinery with Stratasys 3D Printed Parts

Stratasys recently explained an exciting new partnership they’ve developed with Dutch chocolate maker Chocolate Factory.  (Also Dutch) “3D service bureau, Visual First, is using [Stratasys] FDM Nylon 12CF carbon-filled thermoplastic to replace metal machine parts” for The Chocolate Factory.

The Chocolate Factory, which is based in Rotterdam, Netherlands, “runs a network of packaging machines, with the company’s daily throughput relying on the smooth operation of a simple, yet crucial, hook-shaped metal part, which lifts wrapped bars onto a conveyor belt.  A problem occurs when the part malfunctions – typically with such regularity it necessitates replacement three times a month.”  Delivery of these replacements, in the past, have often taken a month.  Obviously, this was simply not good enough.

Enter Stratasys and Visual First.

As Carl van de Rijzen, Visual First’s Business Owner, explains, “with Stratasys additive manufacturing, we can produce customized replacement parts on-demand, capable of performing just as effectively as the metal machine parts.  We can 3D print and deliver production parts to The Chocolate Factory in under a week, which is vital to ensuring manufacturing line continuity.”

Visual First took advantage of Stratasys’ Fortus 450mc Production 3D Printer and Stratasys’ high-performance FDM Nylon 12CF composite material for this project.  Van de Rijzen expounds: “The Chocolate Factory is…enjoying significant economic benefits…with the team reporting 60% cost reduction on the part.”

“Following the success of the 3D printed replacement part, The Chocolate Factory is now turning to Visual First to solve other design challenges – most notably, to develop a prototype casting mold to test acceptance of its products.”

Nadav Sella, Stratasys’ Head of Emerging Solutions Business Unit concludes, “we’re witnessing growing demand for 3D printed production parts and replacement parts for industrial machinery, especially for packaging machines.  These machines require a high-level of customization due to the large variety of products, which are packaged.  In many cases, the use of additive manufacturing can not only save time and cost during the manufacture of such machinery, it can also make them more efficient by reducing weight, simplifying the design, and increasing functionality.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Stratasys

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Danish Technological Institute to Open 3D Printing Facility

3D Printing Industry reports on a recent announcement by the Danish Technological Institute (DTI).

This independent not-for-profit R&D institution, which is headquartered in Taastrup, Netherlands, “is to open a $14.5 million 3D printing center.  The new ‘AM-LINE Center’ (named for its AM-Line 4.0 parent project) will feature manufacturing facilities, training resources for SMEs, and professional advice on investing in 3D printing.  It is set to open at the site of the DTI’s existing Aarhus facility in the Spring of 2018.”

As DTI’s Product Development Lead Claus Erichsen Kudsk explains, last year a report by the non-profit claimed “only 4% of Danish SMEs were making use of 3D printing technologies…neighboring nations had a more competitive edge because of their investment in 3D printing.  Faster and easier development of prototypes is especially a prerequisite for continuing to maintain competitive jobs, but also to maintain a high level of product innovation and to have opportunities for a faster launch for new products.”

The AM-Line Center, which has already been constructed, “will offer SMEs access to four metal 3D printers and a variety of plastic 3D printers.  The facility will also offer post-processing equipment, surface treatment, and quality assurance with CT scanning.”

DTI’s Section Leader Jeppe Skinnerup Byskov added: “small and medium-sized businesses are particularly missing out on the competitive advantages of 3D printing.  The technology is so fashionable that even small businesses can benefit greatly from the big potential of 3D printing.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of 3D Printing Industry

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Global 3D Printing Spending to Reach $12bn in 2018

Itweb recently caught wind of IDC’s Worldwide Semiannual 3D Printing Spending Guide from International.  According to this report, IDC forecasts “global spending on 3D printing (including hardware, materials, software, and services) will be nearly $12 billion in 2018, an increase of 19.9% over 2017.”

“The research firm says by 2021, worldwide spending will be nearly $20 billion with a five-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 20.5%.  Together, 3D printers and materials will account for roughly two thirds of the worldwide spending total throughout the forecast, reaching $6.9 billion and $6.7 billion, respectively, in 2021.”  Services spending will account for $5.5 billion by then.

“IDTechEx forecasts the global market for 3D printing metals will reach a value of $12 billion by the year 2028…in 2017, several companies launched new printer technologies with the promise of overcoming some of the existing barriers to adoption, such as lower printer prices, faster build speeds, and cheaper materials.”

IDC “says the US will be the region with the largest spending total in 2018 ($4.1 billion) followed by Western Europe ($3.5 billion)…China will be the third largest region with more than $1.5 billion in spending this year, followed by Central and Eastern Europe, the Middle East & Africa, the rest of Asia/Pacific (excluding Japan)…the regions which will see the fastest growth over the 2017-2021 forecast period are Latin America (27.2% CAGR) and CEE (26% CAGR).

IDC’s Research Manager of Customer Insights and Analysis Marianne D’Aquila had this to say: “3D printing solutions have moved well beyond prototyping, to become prevalent within and across multiple industries.  Parts for new products, aftermarket parts, dental objects, and medical support objects will continue to see significant growth opportunities over the next five years as 3D printing becomes more mainstream.”

Image and Quotes Courtesy of Itweb

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Researchers Developing 3D Printed Lipstick Applicator

The medical, manufacturing, and transportation industries have been turned on their heads by the advent of 3D printing.  But one $445 billion industry has proven to be a tough nut to crack – that of beauty.  Sure, there have been a few stunning 3D printed dresses, among other accoutrements – but nothing quite substantial enough to create a dent.

Now, however, as reported by Digital Trends, scientists at the U.K.’s Cosmetic Science Group at London College of Fashion have begun to scratch the surface of this elusive industry when it comes to additive manufacturing.

The researchers have developed a 3D printed lipstick applicator, utilizing one of 3D printing’s core strengths: personalization.  The researchers published their findings in the Journal of Dermatology and Cosmetology.  “The work involves both 3D scanning and 3D printing technology to produce a lipstick applicator which perfectly matches the lips of the wearer, meaning no more mirrors necessary” for application.

One of the lead researchers on the project, Dr. Milica Stevic, elaborates: “the first step involves obtaining a high-quality scan of an individual’s lips in order to get a digital image.  This image is then subjected to optimization and further modeling, which is a simple, straightforward, and universal procedure, regardless of the type of lips.  As a result of this, a three-element digital model is obtained: a lipstick base, mold, and cap.  [This is then] manufactured using a 3D printer.  A lipstick formulation is then poured in the mold and the lipstick base adjusted to the top.  The inner part of the mold has a unique shape perfectly matching the lip contours of the individual, so the final product obtained is a lipstick personalized to the individual’s lips.”

“With this personalized lipstick applicator, we have proved the concept, so now we are working on a more sophisticated model more likely to be commercialized.  Personalized cosmetic products are able to treat every consumer individually, and will give them the option to participate in the creation of the products they, personally, use.”

Image Courtesy of Getty Images and Digital Trends

Quotes Courtesy of Digital Trends

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XYZprinting Triples Down on Consumer 3D Printing Market

A few years ago, the Desktop (or, as some have called it, “Consumer”) 3D printing market was all the rage in the media.  What if everyone had a 3D printer in their own home?  So far, this dream has yet to materialize.

However, the 3D printer manufacturer XYZprinting has announced the launch of three new 3D printing products aimed at the Consumer 3D Printing Market.  Perhaps these products aren’t the Desktop 3D printers we’ve all been dreaming about, but are intended for other contexts and other applications.

As Forbes Magazine explains, XYZprinting’s new products are “aimed at schools, consumers, and small businesses.”  The first of these products is the da Vinci Color AiO, “a full color desktop 3D printer incorporating 3D scanning within the machine.”  As XYZprinting elaborates: “this machine combines inject and 3D printing together to allow for creating ‘true depth of color’ and industrial-grade performance.”  “This product is aimed at small businesses and schools – prototyping for the former, and education for the latter.”  The da Vinci Color AiO is priced at $3800.

Additionally, according to Tech Crunch, the da Vinci Color AiO features voice control.  “The service is limited at launch but eventually it will allow users to prep their print job, pause, calibrate, receive status updates, and conduct printer maintenance.”

As XYZprinting’s Associate Manager-U.S. Frank Peng explains: “the 3D printing industry is working together to utilize additive manufacturing’s advantages to better our lives and benefit the consumer’s product usage cycle.  So, ideally, what this means for voice recognition is a car company, such as Ford, would have the ability to keep a digital inventory of their parts and users would give a command of ‘search a 1999 Ford radio tuner for my car,’ and the part would be easily located and printed.”

XYZprinting is also launching the da Vinci Nano, “a compact 3D printer aimed at the home and school market.  With that in mind, the printer has a number of safety features as well as a plant-based filament, which doesn’t pose a safety risk.”  XYZprinting has also developed a K-12 curriculum for the printer, which it is offering to schools.

XYZprinting has also announced the da Vinci 3D Pen Cool, “a standalone 3D printing pen, which can be used to introduce the concept of 3D printing to kids and interested hobbyists for less than $50.”

Peng explains the company’s goals: “we do think the consumer market will take time to develop.  To help with that we also target the education market and work with schools to develop the next generation’s interest in 3D printing…We see a lot of potential in the consumer market.”

XYZprinting’s CEO Simon Shen concludes: “[our goal is to] provide casual users and small business owners the tools and confidence to try their hand at this technology and incorporate it into their everyday lives.”

Image Courtesy of Tech Crunch and XYZprinting

Quotes Courtesy of Forbes Magazine, Tech Crunch, and XYZprinting

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