Paste your Google Webmaster Tools verification code here

Hyperform: Expanding the Limits of 3D Printing

MIT designers develop technique for 3D printing objects larger than 3D printers printing them

MIT designers develop technique for 3D printing objects larger than 3D printers printing them

 

Designers Marcelo Coelho and Skylar Tibbits have tackled one of the main constraints of 3D printing.  According to PSFK, Coelho and Tibbits, in collaboration with Nathan Linder and Yoav Reches of Formlabs were funded by Ars Electronica to solve the problem of 3D printing objects that are larger than the printers printing them.  Normally “to 3D print large objects, you’ll either have to divide the object into several parts or find yourself a [larger] 3D printer.”  However, these MIT based designers developed a new way to solve this problem: Hyperform, “a method that uses material folding techniques as a computational design strategy as well as assembly strategies to enable designers to compress large objects into the bed space of any 3D printer and then lay them out and assemble them after printing.”  When objects printed using these techniques are finished they look “like a long string of chain links with multidirectional notches to allow for easy assembly.”  To demonstrate, the designers printed a 50-foot chain and a chandelier, in order to illustrate the assembly process “and show the potential of Hyperform when it comes to creating large items.  The research team intends to open up Hyperform to other designers and architects who may have other ideas on how the method can be used or developed further.”

Video, Photo, and Quotes Courtesy of PSFK

Share Button

Leave a Reply